Redentore 2012 Celebrations

Redentore is a popular festival that combines the sacred and profane, as Venice celebrations often do.Redentore is the celebration most loved by Venetians, to remind the end of the plague in 1577, one of the most disastrous plagues in Venice history, still commemorated today with "the famous night of fireworks", on the 3rd Saturday of July.

 (Marco Secchi 2012)

On the 3rd weekend in July, religious and political authorities, inhabitants and guests walk on this passageway to reach by foot, from the historical centre of Venice, the temple dedicated to Christ the Redeemer in the island of Giudecca

Venice 15th July 2012 Venetians  and Tourists celebrate the traditional Holiday of Redentore. Highlights of the celebration include the pontoon bridge extending across the Giudecca Canal, gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and a spectacular fireworks display. (Marco Secchi/XianPix)

From eleven to midnight, after the gastronomical moment, the firework show starts on the most beautiful stage ever realized by man. There is no other place on the world, where the light of fireworks may enlight with its colours a mirror of water like that of the St. Mark´s Basin, with the reflection of the Ducal Palace, St. George, the Columns of Mark and Todaro.

Venice 15th July 2012 Venetians  and Tourists celebrate the traditional Holiday of Redentore. Highlights of the celebration include the pontoon bridge extending across the Giudecca Canal, gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and a spectacular fireworks display. (Marco Secchi/XianPix)

 

More images are here

20 Great Things to do in Venice 11/20 – Buy a Gondola!

Ok not a real Gondola but the best thing after that. Alberto Penzo in his wonderful shop  at S Polo 2681 sells amazing Venetians boats reproductions, not the tacky plastic ones you see walking around, we are talking about real gondolas! The Venetian lagoon has a well-established ship-building tradition. Couple that with an intense passion for boat making and you have a stunning collection of gondola model boat kits constantly in production and on sale.

Gilberto Penzo, born in Chioggia in 1954 from a family of craftsmen and shipbuilders, lives in Venice where for many years he has been conducting a vast research, gathering and organizing information about traditional Venetian boats. Explanations and direct examples of the last remaining gondola builders (squerariòi), surveys of ancient templates and patterns, and - in ideal cases - the direct measurement of intact boats, are the sources which allow the author to reconstruct their forms and the construction methods used. These have given rise to a series of books, construction plans, models for museums and private collections, restorations ans reconstructions of boats.With a group of friends who share the same interest, he founded the association Arzanà in 1992 which specializes in the study and conservation of historical Venetian boats.

If you are not coming to Venice soon you can get them here

Bacari, Ombre e Cicchetti - Venice Osterie

If there is a tradition I got accustomed very quickly since relocating in Venice is the custom of the  "ombra" (a glass of wine)....and you cannot possibly have an ombra without some cicchetti...that are small snacks or side dishes. Please do not call them "tapas"! I usually end my Venice Photo Walks with my clients in one...or two of them ;-) VENICE, ITALY - JUNE 17:  Two Venetians women enjoy a drink with "cicchetti" in front of a traditional bacaro on June 17, 2011 in Venice, Italy. The bacari are the local down to earth version of wine bars, they serve  "cicheti" a sort of Tapas, traditionally washed down with a glass of wine, and Venetians stop to snack and socialize before and after meals. ... (Marco Secchi/Getty Images)

Few photos form Bacari around Venice are here

The bacari, open just for lunch and dinner, are the local down to earth version of wine bars which serve 'ciccheti, a kind of snack  traditionally washed down with a glass of wine, and Venetians stop to snack and socialize before and after meals.

May be would be a nice idea to write in the comments a list of YOUR  favourite Bacaro!

I am working on a list of Restaurants in Venice and in the Lagoon....and is here

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Cantina Azienda Agricola or Da Roberto in Rio Tera San Leonardo in Cannaregio. Very good wines and Excellent cicheti all using top products

My review Wine 9/10 Food 9/10 Prices ££ Friendliness 9/10 Value for Money Excellent

Al Volto Calle Cavalli 4081 San Marco Venezia Having  moved not even “a ponte e una calle” from them, decided to test this Bacaro Choice is really good as is the quality. The Risotto was out of this world!

My review Wine 9/10 Food 9/10 Prices ££+ Friendliness 8/10 Value for Money Excellent

Do Spade Just behind Rialto Market Sestiere San Polo 860, 30125 Venice, Italy Another bàcaro dating back to the 15th century, Do Spade offers a great selection of traditional Venetian cicchetti in a cozy if not somewhat dark atmosphere. It is a busy little place and it is full of locals. It’s on a little calle between the Rialto Bridge and Calle dei Bottieri

My review Wine 9/10 Food 9/10 Prices £ Friendliness 7/10 Value for Money  Very Good

Ca’ d’Oro/Alla Vedova. Calle del Pistor, Cannaregio 3912. One of the most famous bàcari in Venice, this one’s both away from the city’s crowds and on the cheap (€1) end of things, ideal if you’re on a budget. Don’t miss the polpette, meatballs made of pork.

My review Wine 8/10 Food 9/10 Prices £ Friendliness 6/10 Value for Money Brilliant

Osteria Al Portego. Calle della Malvasia, Venice, Italy The place is tuck away in a quiet area near S Lio and the Ponte delle Paste. It is owned by a group of young guys. Cicchetti are nice and really fresh, wine is good and staff is very courteous. My only remark is that the prices are on the expensive side if you seat at a table, May just be me...I am used to  drink on the other side of Rialto!

My review Wine 8/10 Food 810 Prices ££ Friendliness 8/10 Value for Money Ok (I suppose)

Do Mori. Sestiere San Polo 429, Calle dei Do Mori. Myth has it that Casanova frequented this bàcaro, also near the Rialto Bridge. Even if he didn’t, it’s still thought to be the oldest in Venice, dating back to 1462. Ask for the “francobollo” (postage stamp)—a tiny sandwich with various fillings, it’s the house specialty.

My review Wine 7/10 Food 7/10 Prices £+ (Polpette are quite expensive) Friendliness 7/10 Value for Money  Good

Cantinone–già Schiavi. Ponte San Trovaso, Dorsoduro 992. This family-run bàcaro, located across from a gondola workshop, boasts raw fish, meats, more than 30 wines available by the glass, and much more. Crowded with Venetians in the evening!

Al Ponte. Calle Larga Giacinto Gallina. One of the cheapest bàcari—and, therefore, places to eat—in all of Venice, Al Ponte has pasta and fish plates and a welcoming atmosphere.

Banco Giro. Campo San Giacometto, San Polo 122. A Grand Canal view, a variety of cheeses, fish, and wine, and a lively atmosphere. What’s not to like?

All’Arco. Calle Arco, San Polo 436. Another one of Venice’s most-loved spots, All’Arco, near the Ponte Rialto, is packed at lunchtime with shoppers from the local fish market. Everything from calamari to liver to shrimp is on offer, and if it’s available, don’t miss the hot sandwich of boiled beef sausage and mustard.

My review Wine 9/10 Food 9/10 Prices £ Friendliness 9/10 Value for Money Excellent

Osteria La Ciurma Calle Galeazza, Venice,  this is a nice little wine bar on a quiet alleyway a short distance from the Rialto Mercato vaporetto stop. Wines are very drinkable and mostly 2 Euros per glass; some less, some a little more. Food offerings are tasty morsals from 1.30 Euros. A great place for a drink among neighborhood people.

My review Wine 9/10 Food 9/10 Prices £+ Friendliness 9/10 Value for Money Very Good

Osteria Ai Osti Sestiere Cannaregio, 3849 Strada Nuova, Venice, A really welcoming ( I think family run) tiny restaurant with no frills but full of real Venetian character. Great traditional food and a good chance to meet the locals

My review Wine 7/10 Food 7/10 Prices £+ Friendliness 7/10 Value for Money Very Good

Diavolo e Acquasanta San Polo 561b, Venice, Italy, Located a few steps away from the more famous restaurant "alla Madonna", this tiny Osteria is geared toward locals rather than tourists. Do not expect upscale atmosphere, or welcoming nice english-speaking waiters. But if you go beyond the unpretentious appearance and the rough manners, you'll find some genuine home-style food, priced below the Venetian average.

My review Wine 8/10 Food 8/10 Prices £+ Friendliness 8/10 Value for Money Very Good

Al Vecio Penasa (not even worth my proper review!)

If they think you are a tourist...they will try to hit you nicely. Been twice and will never get there again. I am Italian but from a different area so the accent is different... both times they charged me the wrong amount. First time was 2 Euros out of 5 E!!!  Today they asked me if I wanted a Tramezzino and Wine at the table and I said NO  still they tried to charge me the price of table service. NOT nice at all  Tramezzini can be nice but do not want to be taken for a ride!

Hidden places.......

“There’re three places in Venice magical and hidden: one in calle dell’Amor degli Amici, a second near the Ponte delle Maravegie and the third in calle dei Marrani, near San Geremia in Ghetto Vecchio. And it’s here that the Venetians took refuge when they are tired of the constituted authorities, in these secret courts in which there are doors that lead them forever to beautiful places and other stories … ” (Hugo Pratt, Corte Sconta detta Arcana).

Procession of the Marie - Venice Carnival

This feast has got very ancient origins and it is just related to a fact occurred many centuries ago. Since the dawn of the history of Venice on the Day of the Purification of Mary on the 2nd of February, it was the custom to consecrate all the marriages on one day and in the Episcopal seat of the time: St. Peter di Castello Cathedral. On the same day the marriages of twelve poor girls were consecrated: for such occasion they were sumptuously dressed and bejewelled, sometimes even with the jewels (borrowed) of the treasure of St. Mark.  Just during one of such celebrations, probably in the year 973, the area was attacked by some pirates who abducted the brides with their jewels. People soon hastened to rescue and get back the precious jewellery and they victorious came back. And it is just in honour of such victory on the pirates that the Feast of the Marie was initiated, establishing the draw of the twelve young girls among the most beautiful ones and belonging to the low social classes, as well as the draw of the aristocrat families that would see to their dressing up for the occasion. VENICE, ITALY - FEBRUARY 11:  The traditional parade of '12 beautiful Venetian girls' forms part of the Festa delle Marie in St Mark's Square on February 11, 2012 in Venice, Italy.The annual festival, which lasts nearly three weeks, will see the streets and canals of Venice filled with people wearing highly- (Marco Secchi)

Once they were ready, on the established day, they reached the chief churches in Venice, while escorted by a procession of boats, in order to attend solemn religious ceremonies. Anywhere they went many refreshments with music and dancing were arranged, as the fact of approaching them was considered as a good omen. The importance of such feast, which during the years came to last even nine days, was so remarkable that it attracted many strangers too, who used to hasten in order to have the opportunity of admiring the wonderful girls. Just because the Venetians, and as above mentioned, not only Venetian people were more interested in courting the brides rather than watching the religious ceremonies, later they were replaced with not so desirable wooden statues. Obviously the male population reacted disdainfully and angrily because of such replacement, so that the Republic was obliged to issue, in 1349, a law which forbade the throwing of vegetables at the Procession of the wooden Marie!!

20 Great Things to do in Venice 3/20 - Ice Cream

Cool down with a delicious gelato

Most Venetians agree that some of the city’s best gelato is served in Boutique del Gelato, a tiny outlet on busy salizzada San Lio. Be prepared to be patient though, because there’s always a huge crowd waiting to be served. See it as quality assurance – it’s worth the wait.

VENICE, ITALY - JUNE 30:  A young customer buys an ice cream from Carlo Pistacchi's Gelateria Alaska in Santa Croce on June 30, 2011 in Venice, Italy. Carlo has been making ice-cream using fresh ingredients for more than 25 years and is renowned for experimenting with new flavours, offering his customers classic favourites such as rum and raisin or chocolate as well as some of his more unconventional creations such as asparagus or rocket salad and orange.  (Marco Secchi)

At Alaska Gelateria-Sorbetteria Carlo Pistacchi is passionate about making ice-cream and experimenting with new flavours using only the freshest natural ingredients. Stick to tried and true choices such as hazelnut or yoghurt, or branch out to sample seasonally changing exotic flavours, such as artichoke, fennel, asparagus or ginger.

Will add my best Ice Cream parlours in Venice soon

Venice Carnival 2012

I know we are not even at Christmas but I just realised yesterday, that Carnival is getting closer and closer. For 2012 will be between the 4th of February and 21st February 2012. The main events will start from the 11th of February. Few tips on what to do are here Even Federico mentioned Carnival yesterday during a very nice book presentation so here we are to talk about Carnival. I know there are many versions about the origins of Carnival, the one that I like best is the following.

VENICE, ITALY - MARCH 02:  Carnival costumes and masks pose near St Mark's Square  in Venice, Italy. The Venice Carnival, one of the largest and most important in Italy, attracts thousands of people from around the world each year. The theme for this year's carnival is 'Ottocento', a nineteenth century evocation, and will run from February 19 till March 8...HOW TO BUY THIS PICTURE: please contact us via e-mail at sales@xianpix.com or call our offices in Milan at (+39) 02 400 47313 or London   +44 (0)207 1939846 for prices and terms of copyright.. (Marco Secchi)

The oldest document pertaining to the use of masks in Venice dates back to 2nd May 1268. In the document it is written that it was forbidden for masqueraders to practice the game of the "eggs". From the early 14th century onwards, new laws started to be promulgated, with the aim of stopping the relentless moral decline of the Venetian people of the day. This restrictive carnival legislation started with a decree on 22nd February 1339 prohibiting masqueraders from going around the city at night. A decree that helps us understand just how libertine the Venetians of the day were, is that of the 24th January 1458 which forbade men from entering convents dressed as women to commit "multas inhonestates"! In a similar vein, the decree of 3rd February 1603 is interesting in that it attempted to restore morality in the convents.

Masqueraders were banned from entering the nuns’ parlous – it had been the convention to sit in the parlous and talk to the nuns. Frequently, decrees were promulgated prohibiting masqueraders from carrying arms or any instrument which could cause harm, or other decrees which forbade masqueraders from entering churches. This obligation was extended to the townsfolk who were not allowed to enter churches wearing "indecent attire". 1608 was an important year, the 13th August to be precise, when a decree from the council of 10 was issued declaring that the wearing of the mask throughout the year posed a serious threat to the Republic. To avoid the terrible consequences of this immoral behavior, every citizen, nobleman and foreigner alike, was obliged to only wear a mask during the days of carnival and at official banquets.

The penalties inflicted for breaking this law were heavy – for a man this meant two years in jail, 18 months’ service to the Republic galley-rowing (with ankles fettered) and not only that, a 500 lire fine to the Council of 10. As for women, they were whipped from St Mark’s all the way to Rialto, then held to public ridicule between the two columns in St Mark’s. They were banned from entering the territory of the Venetian Republic for 4 years and had to pay the 500 lire fine to the Council of 10. 50 years after the decree of 1608, the Council of 10 published a proclamation on the 15th January reaffirming the ban on wearing masks and bearing arms.

It was further prohibited to enter holy places wearing a mask and it was expressly forbidden to wear religious clothes with a mask. In the same decree the use of drums was banned before midday, and even dancing of any description was prohibited outside of the carnival period. Seeing that many Venetian nobles used to go gambling wearing a mask to avoid their creditors, in 1703, masks were banned all year round from casinos.

Two different decrees (1699 and 1718) saw the prohibition of wearing a mask during Lent and other religious festivals which took place during carnival. In 1776, an act introduced to protect the by now forgotten "family honor", forbade all women from going to the theatre without a mask and cloak. After the fall of the Republic, the Austrian government forbade the use of masks for both private parties and elite parties (e.g., la Cavalchina della Fenice) . The Italo-Austrian government was more open but now it was the Venetians who were being diffident. Venice was no longer the city of carnival, but just a little imperial province without personal liberty. During the second Austrian government it was once again permitted to wear masks.

Nowadays is one of the main events in Venice and thousands of people come to Venice.

Redentore Festival in Venice

Redentore is the celebration most loved by Venetians, to remind the end of the plague in 1577 higlights of the celebration are the poonton bridge across the Giudecca Canal, people gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and spectacular fireworks display

VENICE, ITALY - JULY 16: People starts to gather on boats of all sizes in St Mark's basin for the Redentore Celebrations on July 16, 2011 in Venice, Italy. Redentore is one of the most loved celebrations by Venetians which is a remembrance of the end of the 1577 plague. Highlights of the celebration include the pontoon bridge extending across the Giudecca Canal, gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and spectacular fireworks on display. (Marco Secchi)My Redentore gallery is here

Redentore is a popular festival that combines the sacred and profane, as Venice celebrations often do. Redentore is the celebration most loved by Venetians, to remind the end of the plague in 1577, one of the most disastrous plagues in Venice history, still commemorated today with "the famous night of fireworks", on the 3rd Saturday of July. On the 3rd weekend in July, religious and political authorities, inhabitants and guests walk on this passageway to reach by foot, from the historical centre of Venice, the temple dedicated to Christ the Redeemer in the island of Giudecca

For the "famous night of fireworks", between the 3rd Saturday of July and the Sunday after, thousands of Venetians and visitors come to celebrate, in the S. Mark´s basin swarming with boats crowded with people who bring typical culinary delights. Beginning on that Saturday morning, people engages with the organisation and preparation for the Redentore Festival. Foods are cooked for up to 20/30 people; candle-baloons, leafy branches and other trinket are hanged on the boats, terraces and rooftop loggias. Soon as they are ready, those on the boats start looking for the best places in St. Mark´s Basin. After supper with relatives and friends under the showy ornamentation, everybody waits for the great firework show (the "foghi") to begin, usually around 23:00.

Sior Rioba

QUESTA IMMAGINE E' DISPONIBILE GRATUITAMENTE SOLO PER LA PRIMA PUBBLICAZIONE NON PUO@ ESSERE NE VENDUTA NE DISTRIBUITA..Do not resell this image  for info sales@xianpix.com or call our offices in Milan at (+39) 02 400 47313 or London   +44 (0)207 1939846 for prices and terms of copyright.. (Marco Secchi) Sior Rioba has last night spoken, when few hundred posters appeared overnight on statues, bridges and lamp posts in Venice ahead  of a national mobilization of Italian women which will take place in cities across the country on February 13 for the Giornata Nazionale di Mobilitazione delle Donne

Mr. Rioba is portrayed in a corner of the Campo dei Mori, originally he came from Morea along with his two brothers, Sandi and Afan. They arrived in Venice around 1112 and were traders of spices. Signor Antonio Rioba, spokesman of the Venetians in the satire against the Republic, was for a long time for Venice what Marforio and Pasquino were for Rome,