Venice Carnival Photography Workshops 2019

Carnival in Venice

This year the Venice Carnival will be from the 16th February to the 5th March

The Venice Carnival is the most internationally known festival celebrated in Venice, Italy, as well as being one of the oldest. This congregation of masked people, called Venice Carnival, began in the 15th century, but the tradition can be traced back to the beginning of the 14th Century! During those years one of the first laws made by the Serenissima was that masks cannot be used around the city at night. Later, Venice Carnival attracted foreigners - including princes - from all over Europe, who came to enjoy the wild festivities while spending fortunes.

2017 Venice Carnival Atmosphere

2017 Venice Carnival Atmosphere

During the ten days of Carnival leading up to Mardi Gras, Venice is a hive of activity and entertainment, from improvised street entertainment to performances put on by the organizers. A central idea is chosen each year that is taken from various cultural or show-biz themes. Saint Mark’s Square remains the heart of Carnival, with its huge stage, although other events take place throughout the city, helping to avoid an excessive build-up of people in pedestrianized Venice.

During this period I will offer with my team a Carnival Workshop where during the first  2 hours we will take pictures of the Masks and Costumes in St Mark’s Square and then we will head after a coffee break for the Venice Tour. 4h Tour Price is €500 Max 3 people or 2 adults + 2 Teens  – Extra persons MAX 2  € 70 per person.

 

Book here and choose 4h  then specify Carnival in Notes

20 Great Things to do in Venice 8/20 – Buy a Carnival Mask

Venetian masks are a centuries-old tradition of Venice, Italy. The masks are typically worn during the Carnevale (Carnival of Venice), but have been used on many other occasions in the past, usually as a device for hiding the wearer's identity and social status. For a list of what to do during Carnival check my previous post The mask would permit the wearer to act more freely in cases where he or she wanted to interact with other members of the society outside the bounds of identity and everyday convention. It was useful for a variety of purposes, some of them illicit or criminal, others just personal, such as romantic encounters.

Venetian masks are characterized by their ornate design, featuring bright colours such as gold or silver and the use of complex decorations in the baroque style. Many designs of Venetian masks stem from Commedia dell'arte. They can be full-face masks (e.g. the bauta) or eye masks (e.g. the Columbina). Other types of masks are Medico della Peste, (The Plague Doctor), Moretta and Volto

Venice Masks are hand made at Ca del Sol in preparation of Carnival 2011...***Agreed Fee's Apply To All Image Use***.Marco Secchi /Xianpix.tel +44 (0)207 1939846.tel +39 02 400 47313. e-mail sales@xianpix.com.www.marcosecchi.com (Marco Secchi)

One of my favorite shops for Masks is Ca del Sol in Fondamenta Osmarin near Ponte dei Greci..

Another very nice shop is "La bottega dei Mascareri", of brothers Sergio and Massimo Boldrin, located at the foot of the Rialto bridge in Venice since 1984, offers authentic masks worked in a centuries-old craft.

if you have any recommended shop please do add it in the comments or send us an email and we will add it.....

 

 

Volo dell'Angelo or Flight of the Angel

The Flight of the Angel is an event usually held on Shrove Thursday of Carnival (grasso) this has its roots due to an event that happened in the mid 16th century. In those years, during various exhibitions, a Turkish acrobat did something that stupefied the Venetians.With the only aid of a pole he walked on a rope from a boat tied in Riva degli Schiavoni to the top of St. Mark’s Tower and then from the tower to the Doges Palaces balcony, as a tribute to the doge.A Venetian girl performs as 'Colombina' during the Volo dell'Angelo, as she flies down from San Marco Tower to the square during the official opening of Venice Carnival (Marco Secchi)

A Venetian girl performs as 'Colombina' during the Volo dell'Angelo, as she flies down from San Marco Tower to the square during the official opening of Venice Carnival (Marco Secchi)

The exhibition changed its name and became “The Flight of the Turk”, it has been held every year with various changes, first it was made only by professional acrobats and lately by common people that wanted to show their ability and bravery.

The exhibition name changed into “The Flight of the Angel” when for the first time an acrobat dressed with angel wings tied to a rope was let down the tower, at the end of the descent the doge himself gave the angel impersonator a gift.

The event changed its name again into “Volo della Colombina” (“The Flight of the dove”) starting from 1759. In that year the acrobat dressed as the angel fell down over  the horrified crowd.Since then a wooden dove substitute the men.After the fall of the Republic the event was banned (as many other traditions) until recent times.

Starting from 2001 “The flight of the Dove” become again “The Flight of the Angel” with the reintroduction of a real person instead of the wooden dove, staging the old ritual of the homage of the  sceptre to the Doge. This announced the beginning of the Carnival of Venice with a triumph of confetti and coloured air balloons. The event is now held on the week-end previous to Shrove Thursday and marks the beginning of the festivities.

Procession of the Marie - Venice Carnival

This feast has got very ancient origins and it is just related to a fact occurred many centuries ago. Since the dawn of the history of Venice on the Day of the Purification of Mary on the 2nd of February, it was the custom to consecrate all the marriages on one day and in the Episcopal seat of the time: St. Peter di Castello Cathedral. On the same day the marriages of twelve poor girls were consecrated: for such occasion they were sumptuously dressed and bejewelled, sometimes even with the jewels (borrowed) of the treasure of St. Mark.  Just during one of such celebrations, probably in the year 973, the area was attacked by some pirates who abducted the brides with their jewels. People soon hastened to rescue and get back the precious jewellery and they victorious came back. And it is just in honour of such victory on the pirates that the Feast of the Marie was initiated, establishing the draw of the twelve young girls among the most beautiful ones and belonging to the low social classes, as well as the draw of the aristocrat families that would see to their dressing up for the occasion. VENICE, ITALY - FEBRUARY 11:  The traditional parade of '12 beautiful Venetian girls' forms part of the Festa delle Marie in St Mark's Square on February 11, 2012 in Venice, Italy.The annual festival, which lasts nearly three weeks, will see the streets and canals of Venice filled with people wearing highly- (Marco Secchi)

Once they were ready, on the established day, they reached the chief churches in Venice, while escorted by a procession of boats, in order to attend solemn religious ceremonies. Anywhere they went many refreshments with music and dancing were arranged, as the fact of approaching them was considered as a good omen. The importance of such feast, which during the years came to last even nine days, was so remarkable that it attracted many strangers too, who used to hasten in order to have the opportunity of admiring the wonderful girls. Just because the Venetians, and as above mentioned, not only Venetian people were more interested in courting the brides rather than watching the religious ceremonies, later they were replaced with not so desirable wooden statues. Obviously the male population reacted disdainfully and angrily because of such replacement, so that the Republic was obliged to issue, in 1349, a law which forbade the throwing of vegetables at the Procession of the wooden Marie!!

The bull has arrived

A huge bull, Carnival 2012 Allegory, has arrived in Venice. The Allegory is inspired by ancient rites of the venetian lagoon, linked to the antique celebration of the bulls. The Bull will be Venice carnival main symbol, until the last day, Tuesday the 21st, when the Bull will become the protagonist of a ritual of “sacrifice”. VENICE, ITALY - FEBRUARY 04:  A gondola sails on the Grand Canal at Punta della Dogana where a model of a giant bull - the 2012 edition symbol - has been placed on February 4, 2012 in Venice, Italy. The Carnival of Venice (Carnevale di Venezia) is an annual festival and starts 40 days before Easter and ends on Shrove Tuesday ( Martedì Grasso). (Photo by Marco Secchi/Getty Images) (Marco Secchi/Getty Images)

The tradition of the Bull The Carnival of Venice 2012 wants to recall one of the episodes about the history and tradition of the real meaning of "feast" in Venice. In 1162, the patriarch of Aquileia, Urlico from Teffen, allied to some pro-imperial feudatories in the Friuli and occupied the flourishing salt plans of Grado, forcing  Enrico Dandolo to escape. Dandolo, patriarch of Grado fled to Venice, where he asked for help. The Doge of Venice, Vitale Michiel II, answered to this assault by besetting and conquering Aquileia and making Ulrico, the patriarch of Aquileia, his prisoner, along with 12 landowners and 12 clergy. To regain his freedom, Patriarch agreed to submit to any lien: venetians asked Aquileia Patriarch, every year, in the occasion of  Maundy Thursday, to deliver them one bull, 12 breads and 12 pigs to use for a public show in the square.

In the morning of Maundy Thursday, a venetian "tauromachia" (bullfight) took place; during this ritual, the "corpo de' Fabbri"  who had distinguished themselves in battles against Ulrico, had the had the privilege to cut the head of the bull using spears and scimitars, for the glory of the town and Venice.

The traditional event, one of the first to be institutionally included in the Carnival of Venice, was abolished in 1520 by Doge Andrea Gritti, but was revived from 1550 until the fall of the "Serenissima in one version of bullfighting, but without the 12 pigs that do not "were decorated Lordship to ours. "

 

Historic Atelier Pietro Longhi

This is a Magical place...with a capital M. They make the costumes for nearly all the Venetian theatres, Museums, and also for many historical TV and cinema films made in the city. Costumes can be custom made and ordered for the Carnevale. There is even a selection for rent.

VENICE, ITALY - JANUARY 20:  Choreographer Raffaele Dessi (L) and tailor Francesco Briggi (R) of the historic atelier Pietro Longi check few costumes on January 20, 2012 in Venice, Italy. This is one of the busiest periods of the year for the atelier as the next few weeks the streets and canals of Venice will be filled with people attending the carnival,  wearing highly-decorative and imaginative carnival costumes and masks. (Marco Secchi)

VENICE, ITALY - JANUARY 20:  Choreographer Raffaele Dessi (L) and tailor Francesco Briggi (R) of the historic atelier Pietro Longhi check few costumes on January 20, 2012 in Venice, Italy. This is one of the busiest periods of the year for the atelier as the next few weeks the streets and canals of Venice will be filled with people attending the carnival,  wearing highly-decorative and imaginative carnival costumes and masks.

There is a wide range of costumes available, but the majority are linked to the city's history. They even made a replica of Henry the VIII  dress, exactly identical to the original; the only problem is that it weighs in my view more than 3 kilos.

They make the three cornered hats, "zimare"  etc etc! Everybody is really lovely, helpful and they have so many stories to tell you that you do now want to leave!

Venice Carnival 2012 - What to do and where to go?

When you think of Venice, what do you think of first? Certainly, the canals and Venice gondolas come to mind quickly, but almost as quickly you’ll get images of people in gorgeous and elaborate costumes – complete with ornate masks – as they celebrate Carnevale each year. While Carnevale (Carnival in English) is a holiday which is recognized throughout Italy, Venice is the most famous city in Italy for its Carnevale festivities. So, if you want to see Carnevale in Venice, keep reading – you’ll need a few tips before you dive in. I wrote about the history of carnival here before. VENICE, ITALY - MARCH 02:  Carnival costumes and masks pose near St Mark's Square  in Venice, Italy. The Venice Carnival, one of the largest and most important in Italy, attracts thousands of people from around the world each year. The theme for this year's carnival is 'Ottocento', a nineteenth century evocation, and will run from February 19 till March 8...HOW TO BUY THIS PICTURE: please contact us via e-mail at sales@xianpix.com or call our offices in Milan at (+39) 02 400 47313 or London   +44 (0)207 1939846 for prices and terms of copyright.. (Marco Secchi)

- Bring yourn own costumes or hire them. Anyway, be a mask or a historic costume. A brillian place for Masks and Costumes is Ca del Sol - The only problem is that t will be so hard to cross San Marco. Lots of people are trying to photograph with you and you hear mostly: "Una foto per favore..." - Most action happens around San Marco and it is a good idea to stay not far from it - Attend a ball if you can afford it The Ballo del Doge by Antonia Sautter is the place to be...and be seen! - Get lost and discover the real Venice... This can be done anytime but it is particularly true around Carnival Time - Eat lots of Frittole and Galani - Attend a costumed dinner - Pray for good weather - Attend a Venice Carnival Photography Workshop ;-)  this year I will host one with my colleague Guillem Lopez! - Learn the programme

Venice Frittelle (Frittole)

frittele of St Giuseppe, pastry typical of mar... Ok Ok I know Christmas and New Year are still here, but we have to think ahead and ahead in sweets terms means: Frittelle…Frittole..Fritoe, or fritters, are the most famous dolci or sweets of  Venice during the Carnival Season.

Frittelle begin showing up in pastry shops, Cafes and  bakeries, mid January and  during the weeks leading up to il Carnevale di Venezia. When Carnival is over, frittelle disappear from the store windows almost as quickly as tourists in masks.

Frittelle come in a variety of styles, both filled and unfilled, the available choices usually include:

Frittelle veneziane. No filling, but with raisins and pine nuts mixed into the fairly heavy dough. After frying, the frittelle are rolled in granulated sugar.

Frittelle con crema chantilly. Filled with a light vanilla-flavored pastry cream and rolled in granulated sugar.

Frittelle con cioccolata. Filled with a mild chocolate-flavoured pastry cream and rolled in granulated sugar.

Frittelle con zabaione. Filled with a Marsala-flavored pastry cream and rolled in granulated sugar.

The most famous and renowned places where to get the Frittelle (and my votes) are:

  • Pasticceria Tonolo: Contrada San pantalon in Dorsoduro 10/10
  • Pasticceria Didovitch: Campo Santa Marina     9/10
  • Pasticceria Bonifacio Calle degli Albanesi San Marco 4/10 (uncooked)
  • Panifico Fornareto Calle del Forner Cannaregio  8/10
  • Coffe Pasticceria Pitteri Strada Nuova Cannaregio  9/10 but poor Cappuccino!
  • Dal Mas  Cannaregio Rio Terà Lista de Spagna, 150  8/10
  • Rosa Salva  (5/10)

The worst Frittelle (IMHO)

  • Majer (San Giacomo dell’Orio) : just one word Terrible!!!

Last year prices were around 1.00 and 1.30 Euro each  but I have seen also a few outrageous 1.50

Venice Carnival 2012

I know we are not even at Christmas but I just realised yesterday, that Carnival is getting closer and closer. For 2012 will be between the 4th of February and 21st February 2012. The main events will start from the 11th of February. Few tips on what to do are here Even Federico mentioned Carnival yesterday during a very nice book presentation so here we are to talk about Carnival. I know there are many versions about the origins of Carnival, the one that I like best is the following.

VENICE, ITALY - MARCH 02:  Carnival costumes and masks pose near St Mark's Square  in Venice, Italy. The Venice Carnival, one of the largest and most important in Italy, attracts thousands of people from around the world each year. The theme for this year's carnival is 'Ottocento', a nineteenth century evocation, and will run from February 19 till March 8...HOW TO BUY THIS PICTURE: please contact us via e-mail at sales@xianpix.com or call our offices in Milan at (+39) 02 400 47313 or London   +44 (0)207 1939846 for prices and terms of copyright.. (Marco Secchi)

The oldest document pertaining to the use of masks in Venice dates back to 2nd May 1268. In the document it is written that it was forbidden for masqueraders to practice the game of the "eggs". From the early 14th century onwards, new laws started to be promulgated, with the aim of stopping the relentless moral decline of the Venetian people of the day. This restrictive carnival legislation started with a decree on 22nd February 1339 prohibiting masqueraders from going around the city at night. A decree that helps us understand just how libertine the Venetians of the day were, is that of the 24th January 1458 which forbade men from entering convents dressed as women to commit "multas inhonestates"! In a similar vein, the decree of 3rd February 1603 is interesting in that it attempted to restore morality in the convents.

Masqueraders were banned from entering the nuns’ parlous – it had been the convention to sit in the parlous and talk to the nuns. Frequently, decrees were promulgated prohibiting masqueraders from carrying arms or any instrument which could cause harm, or other decrees which forbade masqueraders from entering churches. This obligation was extended to the townsfolk who were not allowed to enter churches wearing "indecent attire". 1608 was an important year, the 13th August to be precise, when a decree from the council of 10 was issued declaring that the wearing of the mask throughout the year posed a serious threat to the Republic. To avoid the terrible consequences of this immoral behavior, every citizen, nobleman and foreigner alike, was obliged to only wear a mask during the days of carnival and at official banquets.

The penalties inflicted for breaking this law were heavy – for a man this meant two years in jail, 18 months’ service to the Republic galley-rowing (with ankles fettered) and not only that, a 500 lire fine to the Council of 10. As for women, they were whipped from St Mark’s all the way to Rialto, then held to public ridicule between the two columns in St Mark’s. They were banned from entering the territory of the Venetian Republic for 4 years and had to pay the 500 lire fine to the Council of 10. 50 years after the decree of 1608, the Council of 10 published a proclamation on the 15th January reaffirming the ban on wearing masks and bearing arms.

It was further prohibited to enter holy places wearing a mask and it was expressly forbidden to wear religious clothes with a mask. In the same decree the use of drums was banned before midday, and even dancing of any description was prohibited outside of the carnival period. Seeing that many Venetian nobles used to go gambling wearing a mask to avoid their creditors, in 1703, masks were banned all year round from casinos.

Two different decrees (1699 and 1718) saw the prohibition of wearing a mask during Lent and other religious festivals which took place during carnival. In 1776, an act introduced to protect the by now forgotten "family honor", forbade all women from going to the theatre without a mask and cloak. After the fall of the Republic, the Austrian government forbade the use of masks for both private parties and elite parties (e.g., la Cavalchina della Fenice) . The Italo-Austrian government was more open but now it was the Venetians who were being diffident. Venice was no longer the city of carnival, but just a little imperial province without personal liberty. During the second Austrian government it was once again permitted to wear masks.

Nowadays is one of the main events in Venice and thousands of people come to Venice.

The Venice Carnival Photo Book

My  photo book  "Carnival in Venice 2011" is out, it is about 40 pages and more than 50 photographs. You can take a look at the preview of few pages

Every year Venice celebrates Carnival, which lasts for two weeks and ends on Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday, so today was the final day! Compared to last year, the last day of this year's Venice carnival is estimated to have witnessed a rise in tourist numbers. The combined figures offered by Venice police and hotel operators suggest that as many as 160,000 tourists were in Venice for the annual carnival's closing Sunday.

It has been a very busy and intense 2 weeks, but with lots of fun as well and hundreds of pictures.

Venice Carnival Fever

On Saturday 19 and Sunday 20 February, the “Festa Veneziana” (Venetian Festival) took place in Venice. The prologue to the Carnival – to be held this year from 26 February to 8 March – is dedicated to the people of Venice. Over the weekend, several of the city’s rowing associations made their way through the city’s famous canals.

The festivities ended with the “Volo della Pantegana” (the flight of the rat), a parody of the flight of the angel, which traditionally opens the Carnival.

VENICE, ITALY - FEBRUARY 20:  A woman wearing Carnival costume and mask poses in St Mark Square on February 20, 2011 in Venice, Italy. The Venice Carnival, one of the largest and most important in Italy, attracts thousands of people from around the world each year. The  theme for this year's carnival is Ottocento amd Sissi, a nineteenth century evocation, and will run from February 19 till March 8.  (Marco Secchi)

More pictures of Venice Carnival check under Images

Venice Frittelle - Venezia Fritole

frittele of St Giuseppe, pastry typical of mar...
Image via Wikipedia

Frittelle...Fritoe, or fritters, are the most famous dolci or sweets of  Venice during the Carnival Season.

Frittelle begin showing up in pastry shops, Cafes and  bakeries, mid Januaryand  during the weeks leading up to il Carnevale di Venezia. When Carnival is over, frittelle disappear from the store windows almost as quickly as tourists in masks.

Frittelle come in a variety of styles, both filled and unfilled, the available choices usually include:

Frittelle veneziane. No filling, but with raisins and pine nuts mixed into the fairly heavy dough. After frying, the frittelle are rolled in granulated sugar.

Frittelle con crema chantilly. Filled with a light vanilla-flavored pastry cream and rolled in granulated sugar.

Frittelle con cioccolata. Filled with a mild chocolate-flavored pastry cream and rolled in granulated sugar.

Frittelle con zabaione. Filled with a Marsala-flavored pastry cream and rolled in granulated sugar.

The most famous and renowned places were to get the Frittelle and my vote

  • Pasticceria Tonolo: Contrada San pantalon in Dorsoduro 10/10
  • Pasticceria Didovitch: Campo Santa Marina     8/10
  • Pasticceria Bonifacio Calle degli Albanesi San Marco 9/10
  • Panifico Fornareto Calle del Forner Cannaregio  8/10
  • Coffe Pasticceria Pitteri Strada Nuova Cannaregio  9/10 but poor Cappuccino!
  • Dal Mas  Cannaregio Rio Terà Lista de Spagna, 150  8/10
  • Rosa Salva  (6/10)

 

The worst Frittelle (IMHO Majer (San Giacomo dell'Orio) : just one word Terrible!!!

This year prices are around 1.10 and 1.30 Euro each  but I have seen also a few outrageous 1.80