Redentore 2012 Celebrations

Redentore is a popular festival that combines the sacred and profane, as Venice celebrations often do.Redentore is the celebration most loved by Venetians, to remind the end of the plague in 1577, one of the most disastrous plagues in Venice history, still commemorated today with "the famous night of fireworks", on the 3rd Saturday of July.

 (Marco Secchi 2012)

On the 3rd weekend in July, religious and political authorities, inhabitants and guests walk on this passageway to reach by foot, from the historical centre of Venice, the temple dedicated to Christ the Redeemer in the island of Giudecca

Venice 15th July 2012 Venetians  and Tourists celebrate the traditional Holiday of Redentore. Highlights of the celebration include the pontoon bridge extending across the Giudecca Canal, gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and a spectacular fireworks display. (Marco Secchi/XianPix)

From eleven to midnight, after the gastronomical moment, the firework show starts on the most beautiful stage ever realized by man. There is no other place on the world, where the light of fireworks may enlight with its colours a mirror of water like that of the St. Mark´s Basin, with the reflection of the Ducal Palace, St. George, the Columns of Mark and Todaro.

Venice 15th July 2012 Venetians  and Tourists celebrate the traditional Holiday of Redentore. Highlights of the celebration include the pontoon bridge extending across the Giudecca Canal, gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and a spectacular fireworks display. (Marco Secchi/XianPix)

 

More images are here

Venice's Cats...where are they gone??

VENICE, ITALY - AUGUST 27:  A stray car sleeps on the "fondamenta" on the edge of a canal on August 27, 2011 in Venice, Italy. Dingo is the Anglo-Venetian association part of the AISPA,  founded in 1965 by Helen Saunders and Elena Scapabolla and is devoted to the welfare of venetian stray cats. (Marco Secchi) For a Gallery of Venetian Stray Cats click here

The Lion of St. Mark is Venice's mascot, at least among sculptors and decorators but in real life, the closest lion is probably at the Parco Natura Viva just outside Verona ;-)

With no living lions to reign over Venice, the local feline population has adopted a surrogate leonine role. Back in the 1980s, when I spent my year in Venice as part of the national army service, cats were seen everywhere in the city: sunning themselves on park benches, perched on bridges, wandering the streets, and dining on leftovers at the Rialto fish market.

Now the cat population has been limited mainly by laws and modern way of life, there are still few colonies the main ones are at Ospedale Civile (yes inside!) , at San Lorenzo near the Church, at Bacini, at Giudecca near Ponte Lungo at the Arsenale, there are quite few at the Lido and one at Torcello!

There is an Anglo Italian organization Dingo part of AISPA that works to feed, protect and maintain colonies in a healthy and modern way, they also run the "gattile" (Cattery)  at Malamocco. Despite several misconceptions and a bit of Italian racism there are no proofs (!!!) that Dingo or the Cinese people are responsible for the disappearance of cats from Venice!

In a brilliant book titled A Venetian Bestiary, Jan Morris wrote:"The cat has always been an essential scavenger in a city that depends on the tides for its hygiene, and has periodically been decimated by rat-borne plagues. It was Shylock the Venetian who declared the cat to be 'both necessary and harmless,' and when from time to time the municipality has tried to reduce the teeming feline population, the citizenry has always been up in arms in protest. Your Venetian cats are not like others. Sometimes of course they live in the bosoms of families, and are fed on canned horsemeat, and prettied up with bows: but far more often they survive half-wild, in feral gangs or covens of cats, and not infrequently some cherished household pet, observing the lives of such lucky ruffians from the kitchen window, will abandon the comforts of basket and fireside rug, and take to the streets himself."

 

ELLIOTT ERWITT: "Personal Best"

After the MEP in Paris, the Reina Sofia in Madrid and the ICP in New York, this anthological show, a tribute to the extraordinary career of the photoreporter, a member of the historic Magnum agency since 1953, arrives in Venice in the splendid early 20th century Venetian dwelling, now open again following protracted restoration. Magnum photographer Elliott Erwitt poses for a picture in front one of his iconic pictures during the press preview of his exhibition 'Personal Best' on March 29, 2012 in Venice, Italy. The exhibition 'Personal Best' on the island of Giudecca will stay open until 15th July 2012 (Marco Secchi) Around 140 photographs, witnessing a long career and the past six decades of history of our world and contemporary civilization, are on display in a selection under the direct curatorship of their author.

Few pictures on my archive are here and on Getty Images are here

Place CASA DEI TRE OCI
Address Giudecca 43
Boat stop Linea 2 Actv Zitelle
Times Opening hours: 10am - 7pm. Saturday 10am - 10pm.

20 Things to do in Venice 11/20 – Take a tour of the Grand Canal

Take a tour of the Grand Canal

A wonderful way to take in the Grand Canal is on board a vaporetto (a rounded 230-passenger boat). I have talked before about them here and here .The canal may no longer be teeming with merchandise-laden cargo boats, but it is still the main thoroughfare of Venice, and only a little imagination is needed to understand its historical importance. The three and a half kilometre (two-mile) trip from the railway station to San Marco provides a superb introduction to the city, telling you more about the way Venice works – and has always worked – than any historical tome.

VENICE, ITALY - AUGUST 11:  A Gondola sails the Grand Canal in front of a busy Rialto bridge on August 11, 2011 in Venice, Italy. Italian heritage group Italia Nostra warned  that Venice is facing an irreversible environmental catastrophe unless visitor numbers are capped. The acceptable maximum number of tourists for Venice is 33,000. In 2011 the average number of visitors to the city daily is 60,000 that is too high for such a fragile city and is causing the gradual destruction of the lagoon ecosystem. (Marco Secchi)

Every family of note had to have a palazzo here, and this was not just for reasons of social snobbery. The palazzi are undeniably splendid but they were first and foremost solid commercial enterprises, and their designs are as practical as they are eye-catching.

Vaporetto tickets can be purchased at most stops, at tabacchi (tobacconists, identified by a white T on a black or blue background) and at Hellovenezia offices On board, you can only buy single tickets. The fare for a shuttle journey (ie one stop across the Grand Canal, the hop across to the Giudecca, or from Sant’Elena to the Lido) is €2.

20 Great Things to do in Venice 4/20 - View over Venice

Get a bird's-eye view of Venice

At almost 99m (325ft), the Campanile is the city’s tallest building, originally built between 888 and 912 (in July 1902 it collapsed, imploding in a neat pyramid of rubble. It was rebuilt exactly 'as it was, where it was', as the town council of the day promised). Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III rode a horse to the top of the original in 1451; these days visitors take the lift. The view is superb, taking in the Lido, the whole lagoon and (on a clear day) the Dolomites in the distance.

But my favourite view is from the Campanile of San Giorgio.....you can get there taking the Vaporetto n2 and is just one stop. The entrance is from the beautiful Church, and usually you should be able to admire as well Tintoretto  the Last Supper, 1592-94, one of the last works the artist painted. If is not there....write to Mr Vittorio Sgarbi one of the worst curator of the Italian Pavillion at Biennale...that decided to get it on loan to "sex up" his own very poor choice of "art" for 2011 Biennale Arte (Marco Secchi)

P&O Cruise Ship "Oriana" enters Canale della Giudecca

Redentore Festival in Venice

Redentore is the celebration most loved by Venetians, to remind the end of the plague in 1577 higlights of the celebration are the poonton bridge across the Giudecca Canal, people gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and spectacular fireworks display

VENICE, ITALY - JULY 16: People starts to gather on boats of all sizes in St Mark's basin for the Redentore Celebrations on July 16, 2011 in Venice, Italy. Redentore is one of the most loved celebrations by Venetians which is a remembrance of the end of the 1577 plague. Highlights of the celebration include the pontoon bridge extending across the Giudecca Canal, gatherings on boats in the St Mark's basin and spectacular fireworks on display. (Marco Secchi)My Redentore gallery is here

Redentore is a popular festival that combines the sacred and profane, as Venice celebrations often do. Redentore is the celebration most loved by Venetians, to remind the end of the plague in 1577, one of the most disastrous plagues in Venice history, still commemorated today with "the famous night of fireworks", on the 3rd Saturday of July. On the 3rd weekend in July, religious and political authorities, inhabitants and guests walk on this passageway to reach by foot, from the historical centre of Venice, the temple dedicated to Christ the Redeemer in the island of Giudecca

For the "famous night of fireworks", between the 3rd Saturday of July and the Sunday after, thousands of Venetians and visitors come to celebrate, in the S. Mark´s basin swarming with boats crowded with people who bring typical culinary delights. Beginning on that Saturday morning, people engages with the organisation and preparation for the Redentore Festival. Foods are cooked for up to 20/30 people; candle-baloons, leafy branches and other trinket are hanged on the boats, terraces and rooftop loggias. Soon as they are ready, those on the boats start looking for the best places in St. Mark´s Basin. After supper with relatives and friends under the showy ornamentation, everybody waits for the great firework show (the "foghi") to begin, usually around 23:00.

Flying above Venice

The Seawings tours are specifically designed to complement your cruise experience, Seawings  encourage you to relax as your guide whisks you away to the historic Island of San Clemente; explore the grounds of the luxurious San Clemente Palace Hotel & Resort and hop on board for memories that will last forever. Providing unparalleled and rarely seen aerial views of the Venetian Lagoon and the islands of San Servolo, San Giorgio Maggiore, Giudecca, Torcello and Lido, Seawings promises you all the excitement in a lot less time.

No other tour provides such a complete picture of the enitire empire of Venezia. Seawings guided sightseeing tour of Venice is truly a unique way to see Venice as never before.

VENICE, ITALY - JULY 07:    A general view of the Venice with Giudecca, San Giorgio Island and the Lagoon seen during the Seawing  tour above Venice on July 7, 2011 in Venice, Italy. Seawings has started a new tour of Venice by seaplane, offering aerial views of the Venetian Lagoon and its historic islands, continuing a long history of seaplanes in Venice.  (Marco Secchi)