Venice Carnival: is it really necessary?

The circus performances, under the theme ‘Lights, Camera, Action’, are inspired by the work of Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini.  

The flotilla featured tightrope walkers, fire eaters, boats and animal floats to the backdrop of music from Fellini’s films.  Circus performers hold up barbells and breathe fire as part of Venice Carnivale celebrations

However, celebrations were marred by reports of thousands stranded outside the gates along the banks of the canal.

According to local paper 'La Nuova Venezia', police restricted entry to the Cannaregio Canal. It is part of a push by authorities to restrict the crowd size to 6,000 people, citing public safety concerns.

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More tourists are expected to arrive in the city as festivities ramp up. The celebration of the Angel’s Flight in Saint Mark’s Square, a major festival event that takes place next Sunday, has in recent years drawn crowds of over 100,000 people. This year there will be a restriction of 20,000 in Saint Mark's Square so expect more chaos.

The Venice Carnival should return to its "original" roots of 1980, lose most of the commercial aspects to return to be a celebration for the Venetians and tourist who like to take part, with activities all over the city and in most of the Campi and stop being monothematic in Saint Mark's Square.

Venice Photo Tour On the Steps of Canaletto

Giovanni Antonio Canal, alias Canaletto, was a painter and engraver who lived in Venice in the 18th century; he is world-famous for his wonderful views of Venice.

Topography, architecture, nature, atmosphere and lights are all mingled in his masterpieces creating realistic scenarios and authentic testimonials of the life and architecture of his time.

This itinerary propose the same places that Canaletto depicted in his works taking the participant to look at each location from the same angulation as if he/she were looking through Canaletto’s own eyes, searching for the differences between the 18th century Venetian landscape and today’s landscape as well as for what has remained unvaried since Canaletto’s time.

Le grand guide de Venise - sur les pas de Guardi et Canaletto 
Guardi, Canaletto et autres artistes du XVIIIe siècle se sont attachés à peindre toutes les facettes de leur ville. Près de trois siècles plus tard, Alain Vircondelet, un des plus grands historiens de Venise,  avec photographe Marco Secchi  s'adonne à une comparaison passionnante entre les photos de la ville d'aujourd'hui et les tableaux de celle d'hier. Douze circuits sont ainsi proposés au lecteur et commentés par l'auteur.

Un guide de Venise passionnant en pleine actualité de l'exposition dédiée à Canaletto au Musée Maillol.

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Wax portraits at Fortuny

The world’s first exhibition on wax portraits will analyse a field that has been studied very little by art historians: that of life-size wax figures. This fascinating subject has recently attracted the attention of numerous contemporary artists, but has never had a specific exhibition devoted to it.VENICE, ITALY - MARCH 09:  Few portraits of criminals modelled in the late 19th century by Lorenzo Tenchini, a pupil of Cesare Lombroso are seen at the press preview of "Avere Una Bella Cera - Wax Portraits Exhibition" at Palazzo Fortuny on March 9, 2012 in Venice, Italy.   The exhibition open until June 25 is the world's first exhibition on wax portraits analizing a field that has been studied very little by art historians. (Marco Secchi/Getty Images)

The project was inspired by two fortunate coincidences, the existence of a series of life- size wax portraits in Venice’s public collections and churches, and the centenary of the publication of Geschichte der Porträtbildnerei in Wachs (“History of Portraiture in Wax”), written by the famous Viennese art historian Julius von Schlosser and the first work devoted to the history of wax portraits. A superb Italian translation of Schlosser’s work by Andrea Daninos has recently been published, complete with an extensive and detailed critical commentary.

The Venetian exhibition is the outcome of more than three years of research and, for the first time, it brings together nearly all of the extant sculptures in Italy, most of which unpublished or never displayed before.