My Fav Settings for Fujifilm XT2

I love my Fujifilm XT2 and these are the settings I tend to use most

I Shoot RAW + Fine JPG - set to M (12Mp) size so I get a full 24Mp RAW plus a super clean super sharp 12Mp JPG which is good enough a lot of the time for event work

To avoid Haloing in the JPGs I have sharpness to Minus 2 .... Noise reduction to Minus 3 seems to be a good balance between detail and leathery low NR artifacts - using the 12Mp size on these settings is superb and reminds me of the old Bayer 12Mp X100 and its almost Perfect ultrasharp JPG engine , if I need to crop or more rez, I`ve got the RAW..

I set boost to ON

Smallest single AF point with the full number of points available set in the menus

Choose Film sim depending on shoot / subject ..

For portraits I love the look of Astia with DR200 and +1EV.  It brings up the mid tones and preserves the highlights.

Fujifilm X-E3 my review

Fujifilm designed the new X-E3 to be an ultra compact rangefinder-style mirrorless camera you can slip in a pocket and get professional-quality results with. The idea seems to have been to craft a super-portable point-and-shoot that even casual users can carry anywhere, without sacrificing the image quality X-series users are accustomed to. If that was the intent, then Fujifilm has hung the moon.

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Fujifilm X-E3: Specifications

  • 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III sensor
  • X-Processor Pro engine
  • Fujifilm X mount
  • ISO 200-12,800 (ISO 100-51,200 extended)
  • 4K UHD video recording, 30/25/24p
  • 325 AF points, upgraded tracking capabilities
  • 0.39in OLED viewfinder, 2,360,000 dots
  • 3in fixed touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
  • Focus lever
  • Film Simulation modes
  • Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Low Energy
  • SDHC/SDXC card slot (inc. UHS-I)
  • 350-frame battery life
  • 121.3x73.9×42.7mm
  • Approx. 337g (without lens, inc. battery and card)

Look and Feel

As a physical object, the Fujifilm X-E3 is a thing of beauty. Measuring just 4.8 x 2.9 x 1.7 inches, it's significantly cut down in size from the other X-E series cameras, and running your hand over it gives you nothing but flat planes and smooth curves. There's almost nothing on the surface of this camera to snag on your pocket if you're grabbing it in a hurry, and at just a whisper less than 12 ounces, it's clear Fujifilm was thinking more about pockets than gear bags when they designed it.

User Interface

One of the ways Fujifilm got this economy of size was by getting rid of the pop-up flash and eliminating the bulky EVR hump over the sensor aperture. The design team also made the radical (for Fujifilm) decision to eliminate the D-pad control switch in favor of a surprisingly intuitive touchscreen swipe control with all the same functions. This works surprisingly well, and after a little practice thumb-swiping while peering through the viewfinder it feels as natural as the D-pad ever did.

Ease of Use

The X-E3 is almost embarrassingly easy to use. Basically, this camera has two modes: automatic and manual. All the custom settings a professional photographer could want are there in manual operation, which lets you control every detail of the shutter speed, depth of field, and other factors that affect an image. Or, you can switch it over to automatic and the X-E3 will handle all of that for you, remembering to restore your settings when you switch back out of automatic mode.

Accessories

The Fujifilm X-E3 retains the X-mount front of the other models in its line, so it works seamlessly with around two-dozen official Fuji lenses that are already on the market. If you happen to have a lens already, you can order the X-E3 as-is, without the two available kit lenses. Lacking a built-in flash, your only option for lighting up a scene is to mount the included EF-X8 flash on the X-E3's flat top, though its hot shoe works just fine with whatever aftermarket lighting rig you feel like putting up there.

Image Quality

Image quality doesn't seem to suffer at all with the X-E3. It uses the same sensor as the other X-E-series Fujifilm cameras, and nothing has changed about its broad dynamic range and super-sharp resolution. Colors are vibrant and rich straight out of the camera, whether you're working with jpegs or RAW files, and relatively little touch-up is needed, even for professional-quality images.

Walking the dog...early morning...in Venice (Fujifilm XE3)

Walking the dog...early morning...in Venice (Fujifilm XE3)

Fujifilm clearly intended the X-E3 to be a lightweight, versatile lifestyle and travel camera that anybody could use to get great results, even if they know next to nothing about digital photography when they pick it up. By cutting away most of the distractions from the already-slim X-line of cameras, and by combining a sleek, intuitive user interface with an automatic mode that does the much of the thinking for you, they have made something close to the ideal casual carry camera for professional and amateur photographers alike.

Fujifilm XE3 final verdict

The Fujifilm XE3 is a very satisfying mid-range mirrorless camera it will suit anyone entering the World of interchangeable lens photography. For the seripus amater or professional I would suggest to stick to the XT-2. For sure the XE3  feels responsive, handles well, and delivers great-looking 24 Megapixel photos and 4k video with minimal effort. It features a built-in viewfinder, touchscreen with clever gesture controls, an AF joystick for those who prefer a more conventional touch, and Bluetooth to aid with Wifi connections to your phone. 

 

Leica M10 - My impressions

I have owned and used a Leica M10 for about 2 months and these are my impressions

Leica has listened to their users and addressed many of their concerns. The highly anticipated Leica M10 is slimmer which makes it easier to handle and more comfortable to hold. A slew of other features that were upgraded with this camera include:

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  • Thinner and lighter body
  • Bigger and brighter rangefinder
  • Configurable Favorites menu replaces the Set menu
  • Higher resolution rear LCD with a changed aspect ratio
  • Simplified button layout
  • Redesigned and dedicated ISO dial
  • Improved weather sealing
  • Faster buffering, processing and writing to disk
  • Continuous shooting is lightning fast
  • Superior high ISO capability
  • Shoot wide aperture in good light with ease with the 100 ISO base
  • Equipped with the Visoflex EVF for higher resolution and bright and clear images
  • Less shutter lag and blackout with the live view feature
  • Ability to move the exposure and zoom focus point while in live view

You get all these great features that the other cameras do not have and the only sacrifices you'll have to make are reduced battery life and no video.

This great little camera is about 50 grams lighter than the previous camera with dimensions being identical to the M6ttl and the M7. The thumb grip is a little deeper for a better grip and adds to the comfort level.

The redesigned rangefinder is about 30 percent larger and has a magnification of .72 versus the .68 found on previous cameras. This subtle improvement means you can see the 28 mm frame lines more easily and focusing is much easier with the high magnification.

Weather sealing makes shooting in bad weather easier. You still have to protect the camera when shooting in the rain because the M10 cannot be entirely weatherproof. But, the camera will be fine even in the rain if handled with care.

When you press the Menu button, it brings up the Favorites menu which replaces the Set menu in previous cameras. The Favorites menu is a handy option since you can add any options you choose to this menu. Even better, you can configure a Favorites menu for each of your User Pre-Sets.

The ISO dial has a nice look and feel. And, with all three principle variables for exposure - shutter speed, aperture and ISO - intelligently made visible on the outside of the camera, using the camera has never been more convenient. The dial has options for 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200 and 6400 ISO. The auto option is marked by a red A while an M marks the option for Menu. The figures on the dial always override what is set in the Menu.

Although battery life is shorter than in previous cameras, Leica has improved battery life reporting. You start getting warnings from about 5 percent that you are low on battery life. The battery life remaining reduces evenly and the camera works until the battery dies. The INFO screen shows the battery life remaining as a long bar and as a percentage. The bar will be coloured green at 100 percent and will gradually go through yellow to red once you reach 5 percent.

One thing I must say puzzels me

Leica Partnered up with Huawei Android phone. For the M10 there is an iPhone app not compatible with Android. Selling in same-store Android phones AND a camera that cannot use the android app!  This questions logic big time!  And will there be one? In order at least  to restore logic? My Fuji has no problem in connecting with Andorids or IOS ;-)

I have sold my trusted M240 that I will occasionally miss, sold my Leica Q (I never liked, preferred one of my Fujifilm) and kept my Monochrom!

If you're looking for a great camera that has made some drastic improvements, then the Leica M10 is for you. It is designed for easy handling and the upgrades ensure you'll get the best shots.

Luminar 2018 by Macphurn

Editing a photo can be as easy as applying a one-tap filter in Instagram or as complex as creating a multilayered piece of artwork in Adobe Photoshop. Macphun Luminar 2018 is the in-between, covering the gamut from easy to advanced

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Luminar 2018 offers everything a modern photographer needs for photo editing, including new filters powered by artificial intelligence, major speed improvements, a dedicated RAW develop module and a forthcoming in 2018; digital asset management platform.

Users will also benefit from the new intelligent Sun Rays filterLUT support, and real-time noise removal. With workspaces that match different styles of editing, Luminar adapts to deliver a complete experience that avoids clutter and complexity.

Luminar 2018 has been re-built from the ground up for dramatic performance boosts. Existing filters deliver richer colors and depth in less time. A brand new streamlined user interface speeds up working with presets, filters, and masks. With full support of pro options like layers, masks, and blending modes, complex repairs and photo composites can be easily accomplished.

Offer Availability:

You can buy Luminar 2018 here

The Luminar 2018 Black Friday offer will be available from November 21-29 click here

Pricing:

  • Current users of Luminar may upgrade at a Black Friday price of $49 ($39 with your coupon code)
  • New users can purchase Luminar 2018 for $69 ($59 with your coupon code)
  • A collection of bonuses will also be included with every purchase.

Bonuses:

  • A Pack of Urban presets from Contrastly
  • Creative Look LUTs Collection for use in Luminar 2018
  • The Ultra-Wide Landscape Ebook by Ian Plant
  • Lights&Shadows Photo Training Video by Matt Granger

Luminar is a sort of mix between Lightroom and Photoshop. Sure, the image management feature isn’t here yet, and it’s not the graphic design powerhouse that Photoshop is, but it mixes the broad strokes of RAW processor with the fine tuning abilities of a powerful image editor, including support for adjustment layers. For the unfamiliar, layers allow users to choose different blending modes — similar to Photoshop — as well as adjust the opacity. With layers, you also have options for masking and copying entire sets of adjustments. These layers can be removed, and you don’t “damage” the original image, and it’s why photo-editing experts rely on layers in their workflow.

Luminar 2018 adds a number of unique filters and adjustments. One favorite of ours is the sunrays filter, which lets you add artificial light rays and adjust the glow of the surrounding area. When done right, the effect looks realistic.

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Ona Bag Prince Street

I believe you can never have an excess of camera bags  and I trust that everybody needs to have an OnaBags. The quality is unparalleled and the look is at the same time advanced and fantastic. While pricey, these sacks will endure forever. 

The trendy and cool outline of the new ONA Prince Street camera bag bounce out at you promptly. Upon closer examination you understand it is not just another pretty bag, it is as well an exceptionally tough, down to earth messenger bag for a reduced DSLR or full mirrorless camera pack. It comes in two styles - waxed canvas with full-grained cowhide trim, or full calfskin. In both styles the fine materials and workmanship of the bag is truly evident. 

The general configuration is genuinely essential with three dividers (more accessible as extras), two substantial extending front pockets and a back laptop or tablet space. Two front calfskin straps shroud the real metal catches that are effortlessly secured or un-affixed with one hand. The straps are movable to take into account extension. 

 

At $269 for the waxed-canvas model and $389  and in my view the the cost is completely justified by the workmanship and materials notwithstanding the in cool great looks that is going to improve as the bag age.

On the off chance that you are searching for a strong, fundamental travel bag with a great deal of style yet very few superfluous fancy odds and ends, the ONA Prince Street is something to consider for either a little DSLR unit or mirrorless camera framework. 

I use mine easily with the two leicas and 2 extra lenses and works great!

 

Weight: 2.6 pounds 

Outside measurements: 12.5"L X 10"H X 4.5"D 

Inside measurements: 12"L X 9"H X 4"D

Leica M (Typ 240)

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My favorite camera is obviously the Leica, the latest addition to my collection is the M or 240 Type. I shoot most of my portraits, features and reportage using this camera with either the 35 1.4 Summilux or the 50mm 1.5

The Leica M 240 is a digital rangefinder camera with a full-format 24 x 36 mm sensor. As the world’s most compact full-format system camera, the Leica M 240 extends the legendary heritage of the Leica rangefinder M System and unites over 50 years of continuous technical improvements to the system with the best in cutting-edge digital technology.

The Leica M is a digital full-frame 35 mm rangefinder camera. It was introduced by Leica Camera AG in September 2012, and is the successor to the Leica M9 range of cameras. The M uses a 24-megapixel image sensor. The camera is the first M model to feature movie recording, and the first to have Live View—which allows the scene, as seen through the lens, to be composed.The M is compatible with almost all M mount lenses and most R mount lenses (via an adapter). All Leica M cameras are handmade in Portugal and Germany.

The M uses a CMOS 24-megapixel image sensor designed exclusively for Leica by the Belgian company CMOSIS. The sensor contains 6,000 by 4,000 pixels on a 6 x 6 µm² grid, and is made by STMicroelectronics in Grenoble.

The M supports most M-mount lenses, and with an optional R-Adapter, the camera can use almost all Leica R-mount lenses.Live View allows owners of R-lenses to use an optional electronic viewfinder.

The camera uses a MAESTRO image/video processor which is based on the Fujitsu Milbeaut. It has specifically-designed rubber seals (to protect against dust and water spray).

Peak Design System

I’d almost given up on finding a good camera strap solution for the way that I work but luckily I found Peak Designs .  The problem for me is that I often don’t want to have a strap on the camera at all, sometime I just like to use a cuff or a clutch and why notalight strap.   Most strap solutions gravitate towards using big bulky padding of some sort and that makes them both expensive and cumbersome to carry around for the small number of times I find myself looking for a new one. .  I’ve got several straps in my gear closet but all of them gather dust.  They are just too big and overly complex with these slider mechanisms that people seem so fixated with.  I guess if you walk around 12 hours a day with a camera on your shoulder then it might seem more useful but for the way I work it’s just not necessary.  Thing is though,  there’s always some point where I wish I had a shoulder strap with me.  Up until this point though I hadn’t seen a solution that gave me what I wanted.

The Micro Anchor system is the key to making the Leash easy to use and versatile.  Each Anchor is rated to hold 100lbs so you can easily carry your camera kit or even a supertelephoto lens.  The Leash and the Cuff both come with 4 Anchors.  Once you slide them into clip on the Leash and give it a tug you’ll hear it click into place.  To detach the Leash you have to push down on the Anchor and slide it back out of the clip.  It’s a secure system that I loved and trusted straight away.

 

There’s also an anchor point on the adjustment buckle for the Leash.  This means that you can create a loop for tethering your camera to either yourself or a static object like a railing if you are shooting from a building.  If you are carrying a backpack you could also tether the camera to your bag to save it if you ever dropped it.  Speaking as someone who has often found myself peering over the tops of buildings, lookouts, bridges and cliffs, this is an awesome little feature that I’ll be using a lot.

http://peakdesign.com

This post has received discount on Media samples. For more information, check out my full disclaimer policy.

Leica M3 and M2

My Leica M3 Camera

The Leica M3 is perhaps the one camera that does not actually require an introduction. Voted by STUFF Magazine and Ebay as the “Top Gadget of All Time”

The epitome of vintage style, the Leica M3?s modern incarnations are still held as pinnacles of camera design and lusted by photographer all over the world.

Just the fact that since the Leica M3?s introduction 1954, the basic design of Leica M cameras has not really changed is a testament to how well conceived the Leica M3 is. In fact, one could argue that Leica built such a great camera that they haven’t really done much else since.

The Leica MP, introduced in 2003, nearly 50 years after the Leica M3, is just an inferior, and far more expensive, modern copy.The Leica M3 is Leica’s greatest achievement and also a stark reminder of it’s glorious past.

The Leica M3 was in production for 13 years. Do you know how many M cameras Leica has released in the last 13 years? Eight! That’s roughly one camera every 18 months. You have the Leica M7, MP, M8, M8.2, M9, M9P, M-E and the Leica M Type 240. Leica have become just like every other camera manufacturer in the digital world, pumping out a new camera every 18 months to two years. That’s not even counting their partnership with Panasonic!

In 1954 the Leica M3 inaugurated a completely new era of 35mm cameras. Though SLRs had started to appear earlier (e.g. the Exakta system from the late 1940s), the multiple-frameline rangefinder by Leica offered

the smoothest, fastest, most robust shooting experience available, coupled with the then-already optically superior Leitz lenses.

These cameras were constructed to the absolute highest standards of quality and maintainability (everything was designed to be adjustable over a long, long lifespan). As such, as long as the rangefinder optics are clean (the balsam glue of the beam splitter have a tendency to fail after about 40 years on some examples of the M3, fading or completely disabling the rangefinder) this is a very 'safe' camera to buy on eBay.

My copy (a late-model, single-stroke) truly looks and functions like a new camera, despite it's age of 52 years. It's quickest, smoothest, quietest camera I own. Rangefinders are, of course,much more limited than their SLR counterparts, and this could not be considered a "general purpose" camera anymore, but for anybody still practicing the art of developing and printing their own photographs in an analogue manner, the Leica M3 offers arguably the best body to obtain the ultimate image quality possible from the 35mm format.

Being the first "M", the collectivity (value) of the M3 is sure to increase with time, and finally, as an object considered in its own right (not as a tool) the M3 has timeless beauty and pureness of design.

Regarding lenses, nothing fits a Leica M3 better than a Summicron 50mm f/2 - it's small, chromed, and likely the highest-performance M-mount lens yet made (according to several tests). With this lens, you can imagine the M3 being a fixed-lens camera, it's so compact and well-matched. If the light is good, shoot some Ilford Pan F, and be prepared for prints of unmatched quality from the 35mm format.

Mamiya RZ67 Pro II

English: Mamiya RZ67 Professional camera, lens...

The Mamiya RZ67 is my medium format single-lens reflex system camera manufactured by Mamiya. There are three successive models: the RZ67 Professional (first model

released in 1982), RZ67 Professional II (released in 1995) and RZ67 Professional IID (released in 2004). RZ67 is a modular camera system, meaning lenses, viewfinders, ground glasses, film winders and film backs are all interchangeable. It is primarily designed for studio use, but can also be used in the field. The RZ67 Sekor lenses have built-in electronic leaf shutters which are cocked and triggered from the body. Focusing is performed with a bellows on the body instead of the lenses.

The camera accepts 6x7, 6x6 and 6x4.5, 120 and 220 film magazines and Polaroid as well as Quadra 72 4x5 sheet film backs. Mamiya RB67 backs are also supported via the G-Adapter. The film speed is set on each RZ back via a dial. There are two versions of the 6x7 and 6x4.5 backs, the model II versions have a second film counter to always show the film count on the top. The RZ67 operates on one 6V silver oxide 4SR44 battery, or 6V 4LR44 alkaline battery. It can be used in emergency mode fully mechanically with a fixed 1/400 sec shutter speed. Multiple exposures are possible in the M-mode. Mirror flip up is supported. The body has one standard flash hot shoe on its left side, one plug for a standard remote shutter cable release, and a socket for an electronic shutter trigger. The RZ67 measures 104 mm (W) x 133.5 mm (H) x 211.5 mm (L) with the 110mm f/2.8 lens, and weighs approximately 2.4 kg (5.29 lbs). The flange distance is 105 mm.

The RZ67 name is adopted from the model name of the Mamiya RB67 (where RB stands for Revolving Back), which was first introduced in 1970, thus the RZ67 also takes backs which can be rotated 90 degrees to provide a horizontal or vertical composition. The orientation is shown in the viewfinder with black guides. The viewfinder also hosts LEDs informing of the state of the camera (flash ready, low battery, dark slide not removed, shutter not cocked). In addition to manual operation (photographer chooses aperture and shutter speed), the RZ67 is able to operate in AEF mode with an AE viewfinder (AE being an abbreviation for automatic exposure), which transmits exposure information directly to the body. In RBL compatibility mode, the RZ67 is able to use RB67 lenses. The biggest difference between RB67 and RZ67 is, that RB67 is completely mechanical. The RZ67 has also mechanical couplings between the parts, but the shutter is electronic, and parts are able to transmit exposure information with electronic couplings. In addition, the RZ67 has plastic exterior body, which makes it somewhat lighter.

My Fuji X Series Cameras & Lenses

little fujiMy fav. at present is The Fujifilm XT1After starting at the top-end with its X-Pro1, Fujifilm has been steadily expanding its X-series mirrorless camera to appeal to a broader audience. With its X-T1, Fujifilm has moved back towards the high-end, offering a fully-loaded mirrorless camera in a weather-resistant, SLR-style body. There's plenty more where that came from - the X-T1 has one of the largest EVFs we've ever seen, numerous manual control dials and, for the first time on an X-series camera, an optional battery grip.

The 'guts' of the X-T1 are very much like those found on the recent X-E2. This includes the 16 megapixel X-Trans CMOS II sensor (with on-chip phase detection), EXR Processor II, built-in Wi-Fi, and full HD video recording. The main differences between the X-T1 and X-E2 are the LCD (tilting vs fixed) and EVF (in terms of magnification), the maximum burst rate (8 vs 7 fps, now with focus tracking at full speed), a flash sync port and, of course, the design.

The Fuji X series walk-around cameras that can be adapted for wedding work, editorial work heck, even commercial work.

With these cameras I feel unstoppable. Invincible. I no longer need to carry  heavy bulky DSLR around all day – with these cameras I am able to carry an entire kit in a shoulder bag and never tire. With these cameras I rarely miss a photo because I have always have a camera with me.

With these cameras I am stealthy, quick, unobtrusive, silent, a rocket for recording the extraordinary in the mundane of the everyday. My photography changed!

The Fujifilm X-Series range of digital cameras consists of the company Fujifilm's high-end digital cameras and is aimed professional and keen enthusiast photographers. It is part of the larger range of Fujifilm's digital cameras. X-Series itself is not unified by a common sensor size, technology or a lens format. Its main differentiating feature is the emphases on the controls needed by an advanced digital camera user.

I have owned or own at present the following Cameras

  • Fujifilm X100: prime lens digital camera that uses a custom APS-C sized CMOS sensor and Hybrid Viewfinder, and fixed 23mm F2.0 Fujinon lens. Announced at Photokina, September 20, 2010, the X100 launched globally in March 2011. Succeeded by Fujifilm X100S. SOLD
  • Fujifilm X10: advanced compact featuring a 2/3-inch 12-megapixel EXR-CMOS sensor and a high-definition F2.0 wide-angle and F2.8 telephoto Fujinon 4x manual zoom lens (28-112mm). Announced September 1, 2011. Succeeded by Fujifilm X20 SOLD
  • Fujifilm X-Pro1: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera that uses the "X-Trans CMOS" sensor and the Fujifilm XF-mount system of lenses. It was announced in January 10, 2012, and launched in March 2012. SOLD
  • Fujifilm X-E1: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera which is a slimmed-down version of X-Pro1. The modifications include removal of expensive hybrid finder replaced by an upgraded electronic viewfinder. New EVF uses a 2.36M dot OLED unit, out-speccing the X-Pro1's 1.44M dot LCD finder. It was announced on September 6, 2012. SOLD
  • Fujifilm X20: is an the replacement of X10 enthusiast compact camera featuring 2/3-inch X-Trans CMOS II sensor, EXR Processor II and a new advanced optical viewfinder. It was announced onn January 7, 2013.
  • Fujifilm X100S: a redesigned version of the X100 with new sensor-based phase detection, same sensor as Fujifilm X-E2. It was announced January 7, 2013. SOLD
  • Fujifilm X-E2: successor to the X-E1, featuring X-Trans CMOS II sensor, larger (3") screen with higher resolution (1.04 M), Digital Split Image technology, Wi-Fi. Announced on October 18, 2013.
  • 2 Fujifilm XT1 a new camera with a weather-sealed body featuring X-Trans CMOS II sensor and tilting LCD screen. It was announced on January 27, 2014. Also the first X-series camera with an optional battery grip, and the first camera from any manufacturer to fully support UHS-II SD cards.

I have the following Lenses

  • Fujinon XF18mm F2 R18mm focal length (27mm equivalent) F2.0-F16 aperture SOLD
  • Fujinon XF35mm F1.4 R35mm focal length (53mm equivalent) F1.4-F16 aperture
  • Fujinon XF60mm F2.4 R Macro 60mm focal length (91mm equivalent) F2.4-F22 aperture SOLD
  • Fujinon XF18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS 18-55mm focal length (27-83mm equivalent) (F2.8-F4)-F22 aperture
  • Fujinon XF14mm F2.8 R14mm focal length (21mm equivalent) F2.8-F22 apertureSOLD
  • Fujinon XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R OIS55-200mm focal length (83-300mm equivalent)
  • Fujinon XF23mm F2.0 R 23mm focal length (35mm equivalent) F2.8-F22 aperture
  • Fujinon XF27mm F2.8 R 23mm focal length (41mm equivalent) F2.8-F22 aperture
  • Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR: A weather-resistant fast telephoto zoom with image stabilization, covering focal lengths equivalent to 75–210mm on full-frame. Officially announced on September 10, 2014.
  • Fujinon XF 18-135mm f/3.5–5.6 R LM OIS WR: A weather-resistant, image-stabilized superzoom, covering focal lengths equivalent to 27–202.5mm on full-frame. Officially announced on June 16, 2014.
  • Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR: An enthusiast-level standard zoom, covering focal lengths equivalent to 24–82.5mm on full-frame, featuring weather-resistant construction. This lens was originally expected to be available in mid-2014, but has been delayed. Officially announced on January 6, 2015 during CES 2015.

Nikon

I shoot all my breaking news and editorial work using a selection of D4, D3s, and D810 with a wide array of prime lenses all exclusively Nikon F2.8 max. I do not need to say or write anything about these cameras and lenses.While on news jobs I can be seen carrying a huge amount of gear for any situation I am a strong believer of “one camera and one lens”.

Nikon D4_HNC7753

The proponent said that the best way to become more creative in your photography (and less addicted to G.A.S. — gear acquisition syndrome) it to stick often to one camera and one lens. It is one of the worst diseases when it comes to photographers. It causes us photographers to make excuses about our gear – rather than going out and making photographs with what we have. By prescribing to the “one camera and one lens” philosophy I got rid of most of the G.A.S. in my system. Sure, whenever a new camera or a new lens came out I got envious, but I still had an underlying philosophy to stick to.

My favorites are old film cameras and Fuji Mirrorless. Film helps me to relax and concentrate more on composition and creativity

In “Outliers”, the prolific writer/sociologist Malcom Gladwell suggested that the most talented people in the world dedicated at least 10,000 hours to their craft before gaining expertise in their field 10,000 hours is a lot of time. Assuming you practiced something for 2 hours a day, it would take you 5,000 days to master something. 5,000 days is roughly 14 years of daily practice.By constantly switching our equipment and gear, we never really get the time to truly know our camera and focal length. Assuming we are diligent enough as photographers to photograph for 2 hours a day, it would still take us 14 years to master our photography (with a given camera or lens).

I believe when it comes to a “one camera and one lens” philosophy, the way to go is with prime lenses over zoom lenses. Why? Prime lenses force you to see the world in a certain way, and whenever the world doesn’t fit the way you exactly want to, you be more creative. Prime lenses also force you to use “foot zoom”, crouch, and experiment with compositions. Zoom lenses tend to make you lazy, as you can just zoom in and out without making as much of an effort.

Sticking with one focal length forced me to be more creative when it came to my photography. If I wasn’t able to fit a subject in my frame at 35mm, I had to make due. Instead of doing a full-body shot of somebody, I might focus on their hands, their feet, or their facial expressions. If I was too far away from my subject, I would either try to incorporate the background more with my subject— or simply take a few steps closer.

My Fuji X Series Cameras & Lenses

little fujiMy fav. at present is The Fujifilm XT1After starting at the top-end with its X-Pro1, Fujifilm has been steadily expanding its X-series mirrorless camera to appeal to a broader audience. With its X-T1, Fujifilm has moved back towards the high-end, offering a fully-loaded mirrorless camera in a weather-resistant, SLR-style body. There's plenty more where that came from - the X-T1 has one of the largest EVFs we've ever seen, numerous manual control dials and, for the first time on an X-series camera, an optional battery grip.

The 'guts' of the X-T1 are very much like those found on the recent X-E2. This includes the 16 megapixel X-Trans CMOS II sensor (with on-chip phase detection), EXR Processor II, built-in Wi-Fi, and full HD video recording. The main differences between the X-T1 and X-E2 are the LCD (tilting vs fixed) and EVF (in terms of magnification), the maximum burst rate (8 vs 7 fps, now with focus tracking at full speed), a flash sync port and, of course, the design.

The Fuji X series walk-around cameras that can be adapted for wedding work, editorial work heck, even commercial work.

With these cameras I feel unstoppable. Invincible. I no longer need to carry  heavy bulky DSLR around all day – with these cameras I am able to carry an entire kit in a shoulder bag and never tire. With these cameras I rarely miss a photo because I have always have a camera with me.

With these cameras I am stealthy, quick, unobtrusive, silent, a rocket for recording the extraordinary in the mundane of the everyday. My photography changed!

The Fujifilm X-Series range of digital cameras consists of the company Fujifilm's high-end digital cameras and is aimed professional and keen enthusiast photographers. It is part of the larger range of Fujifilm's digital cameras. X-Series itself is not unified by a common sensor size, technology or a lens format. Its main differentiating feature is the emphases on the controls needed by an advanced digital camera user.

I have owned or own at present the following Cameras

  • Fujifilm X100: prime lens digital camera that uses a custom APS-C sized CMOS sensor and Hybrid Viewfinder, and fixed 23mm F2.0 Fujinon lens. Announced at Photokina, September 20, 2010, the X100 launched globally in March 2011. Succeeded by Fujifilm X100S. SOLD
  • Fujifilm X10: advanced compact featuring a 2/3-inch 12-megapixel EXR-CMOS sensor and a high-definition F2.0 wide-angle and F2.8 telephoto Fujinon 4x manual zoom lens (28-112mm). Announced September 1, 2011. Succeeded by Fujifilm X20 SOLD
  • Fujifilm X-Pro1: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera that uses the "X-Trans CMOS" sensor and the Fujifilm XF-mount system of lenses. It was announced in January 10, 2012, and launched in March 2012. SOLD
  • Fujifilm X-E1: Mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera which is a slimmed-down version of X-Pro1. The modifications include removal of expensive hybrid finder replaced by an upgraded electronic viewfinder. New EVF uses a 2.36M dot OLED unit, out-speccing the X-Pro1's 1.44M dot LCD finder. It was announced on September 6, 2012. SOLD
  • Fujifilm X20: is an the replacement of X10 enthusiast compact camera featuring 2/3-inch X-Trans CMOS II sensor, EXR Processor II and a new advanced optical viewfinder. It was announced onn January 7, 2013.
  • Fujifilm X100S: a redesigned version of the X100 with new sensor-based phase detection, same sensor as Fujifilm X-E2. It was announced January 7, 2013. SOLD
  • Fujifilm X-E2: successor to the X-E1, featuring X-Trans CMOS II sensor, larger (3") screen with higher resolution (1.04 M), Digital Split Image technology, Wi-Fi. Announced on October 18, 2013.
  • 2 Fujifilm XT1 a new camera with a weather-sealed body featuring X-Trans CMOS II sensor and tilting LCD screen. It was announced on January 27, 2014. Also the first X-series camera with an optional battery grip, and the first camera from any manufacturer to fully support UHS-II SD cards.

I have the following Lenses

  • Fujinon XF18mm F2 R18mm focal length (27mm equivalent) F2.0-F16 aperture SOLD
  • Fujinon XF35mm F1.4 R35mm focal length (53mm equivalent) F1.4-F16 aperture
  • Fujinon XF60mm F2.4 R Macro 60mm focal length (91mm equivalent) F2.4-F22 aperture SOLD
  • Fujinon XF18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS 18-55mm focal length (27-83mm equivalent) (F2.8-F4)-F22 aperture
  • Fujinon XF14mm F2.8 R14mm focal length (21mm equivalent) F2.8-F22 apertureSOLD
  • Fujinon XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R OIS55-200mm focal length (83-300mm equivalent)
  • Fujinon XF23mm F2.0 R 23mm focal length (35mm equivalent) F2.8-F22 aperture
  • Fujinon XF27mm F2.8 R 23mm focal length (41mm equivalent) F2.8-F22 aperture
  • Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR: A weather-resistant fast telephoto zoom with image stabilization, covering focal lengths equivalent to 75–210mm on full-frame. Officially announced on September 10, 2014.
  • Fujinon XF 18-135mm f/3.5–5.6 R LM OIS WR: A weather-resistant, image-stabilized superzoom, covering focal lengths equivalent to 27–202.5mm on full-frame. Officially announced on June 16, 2014.
  • Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR: An enthusiast-level standard zoom, covering focal lengths equivalent to 24–82.5mm on full-frame, featuring weather-resistant construction. This lens was originally expected to be available in mid-2014, but has been delayed. Officially announced on January 6, 2015 during CES 2015.

Leica M6

The Leica M6 is a rangefinder camera manufactured byLeica from 1984 to 1998.

Leica M6 Wetzlar, Elmar 50, ITOOY

The M6 combines the silhouette of the Leica M3 with a modern, off-the-shutter light meter with no moving parts and LED arrows in the viewfinder. Informally referred to as the M6 "Classic" to distinguish it from the "M6 TTL" models, and to indicate its "Classic" M3 dimensions. The top and bottom plates were made from lighter, cheaper magnesium alloy rather than the heavier machined brass of the M3. The M6 and M6 TTL are mechanical cameras; all functions save the light meter work without batteries, unlike the succeeding M7, which needs electrical power to operate properly.

 

Nikon F3

 Nikon F3 – Still a Viable Shooter?Launched in 1980, the Nikon F3 replaced the F2 as their top of the line professional camera body, and went from being the most controversial to one of the best selling film cameras in the history of the company.

Nikon F3

Prior to the introduction of the F3, the Nikon pro bodies had always been fully mechanical, with no reliance on batteries except to power the meter (if you had one of

the metering heads). The F3, however, used a brand new electronically controlled horizontal-traveling titanium shutter which, in contrast to previous models, required battery power to operate.

This initially caused great consternation in the pro community, and the reluctance of many to switch to the new F3 was a real problem for Nikon. Many press photographers were unwilling to give up the reliability of their mechanical F2s for this new, untested electronic camera.

There are plenty of excellent websites that document the various features of the F3 so I won’t duplicate any of that here. What we’re interested in is basically this: is the Nikon F3 still a viable shooter today? The answer is an unreserved ‘Yes!’. A good clean body will set you back around the $200 mark, which is an amazing bargain for a camera this good, and you can use almost the entire range of Nikon manual focus lenses which can be picked up for equally good prices if you shop around a little.

The metering is very accurate, and for most situations I just leave the camera in auto mode and it very rarely gives me a bad exposure, even when shooting transparency film. The viewfinder is fantastic, one of the best I’ve used in a 35mm film camera, offering a full 100% view of the image area. If you are used to the cramped, squinty viewfinders of some consumer or ‘prosumer’ DSLRs, the F3s finder will be a revelation!

While we are on the subject, my 1986 F3 is the ‘HP’ variant, which means it has the high eye-point finder (DE3), with greater eye relief and a little less magnification. This finder is physically a little taller than the original (DE2) prism, but allows you to see the entire viewfinder image with your eye a little further from the eyepiece, which is particularly useful if you wear glasses. Even if you don’t, it’s still an excellent all-round finder and, although some users prefer the original, the F3HP variant would still be my recommendation.

A quick word about the motor drive for the F3. Known as the MD4, it’s capable of a blistering six frames per second, has power rewind and also powers the camera body when attached. What’s more, the camera and motor drive combo handles beautifully; for me it handles better than just the body alone. These can be had a very little money  and make using the F3 a total blast! Oh yeah, they sound cool too!

Go get you one, and shoot some film!

 

 

Nikon F2

Launched in 1983, the successor of the FE had a relatively short sales career, but a long legacy.BluePyjamaSyndrome’s Nikon F2

It can be argued that the Nikon FM3a, sold from 2001 to 2006, is much more a descendant of the FE2 than of the FM2.

In 1977, a few years after Olympus initiated the compact SLR revolution, Nikon presented the FM. Like the Olympus OM-1, the FM was a compact semi automatic camera with a mechanical shutter, which could be equipped with a motor drive. But contrarily to the OM-1, which still relied on a CdS light metering system and on mercury batteries, the FM used modern gallium photo diodes and silver oxyde batteries.

It also benefited from a vertical blade metallic shutter, and the exposure metering was relying on 3 LEDs instead of the more conventional match needle arrangement of the OM-1. Solidly built and reliable, the FM was very successful commercially, and the ancestor of a large family of models whose production only stopped in 2006.

The FE from 1978 is the automatic exposure version of the FM. It looks very similar to the FM, but instead of LEDs, it uses two needles to show the shutter speed selected by the photographer (semi-auto mode) and by the automatic exposure system (aperture priority auto mode). In 1982, the FM became the FM2, receiving a new mechanic shutter with titanium blades, which could reach 1/4000 sec and had a flash synchro speed of 1/200 sec.

One year later, the FE2 was launched. Its titanium shutter is an improved and electronic version of the FM2?s, with a X synchro speed now reaching to 1/250 sec. The FE2 also benefits from a modern on the film (OTF) flash metering system (that the FM2 never got). The FM/FE range of products was extended the following year with the presentation of the Nikon FA, which added matrix metering (a world premiere), a programmed exposure mode and trade the brass prism cover of the FM/FE models for a polycarbonate one. Both FE2 and FA were discontinued in 1988. The FM2 lived longer, and was ultimately replaced by the FM3a, which merged the mechanical shutter of the FM2 with the electronics of the FE2.

Using the FE2 as an every day camera

Reasonably light and compact, the Nikon FE2 is very solidly built, and very nicely finished. Compared to a previous generation model like the FM, the FE2 has smoother commands. The viewfinder is typical from a pre-high eye point construction – the enlargement factor is high (0.86) for a good focusing precision, but the frame coverage is limited (93%), and the eye point is very short (14mm), which could be an issue for photographers wearing glasses. Even with thin glasses, it’s impossible to see 100% of the image projected on the focusing screen without having to move one’s eye ball right to left and left to right: you only perceive 90% of the focusing screen when you look straight into the viewfinder, which compounded with the rather limited frame coverage, ensures that you’ll have a wide safety margin on both sides of your prints.  The titanium blade shutter was the most advanced at the time of the camera's launch, with a top speed of 1/4000 sec and a flash sync speed of 1/250 sec.

 

The determination of the exposure is very conventional for a camera of its generation, with a center weighted measurement provided by two silicon photodiodes. In automatic mode, a needle indicates the speed selected by the exposure system of the camera on a large scale at the left of the viewfinder. The photographer has multiple ways to override the automatism: he can memorize the exposure (pushing the self timer lever towards the lens), apply a correction factor on the film speed selector (from -2 up to +2EV), or switch to semi-auto mode. In this case, a second needle – larger and transparent – appears in the viewfinder, showing the shutter speed selected by the photographer. In a very simple matching needle arrangement, the photographer just has to align the meter needle with shutter speed needle. The shutter speed knob is much smoother than on the FM (in the FE2 the shutter is controlled electronically), and surprisingly the camera is more pleasant to use in semi-auto mode than the FM. No wonder that Nikon derived the exposure control system of the FM3a from the FE2?s and not from FM’s.

Powered by two easy to find LR44 silver oxide batteries, the camera also operates without battery at a speed of 1/250sec. Compatible with any AI, AIs and AF lenses, it’s still perfectly usable today.Less rugged than its FM and FM2 cousins (it has an electronic shutter and a potentially more fragile match needle metering system), it is more pleasant to use and can respond efficiently to a larger variety of photography opportunities. Like the FA and the FM3a, but unlike the FM2, the FE2 benefits from a modern through the lens (on the film or OTF) flash metering system, compatible with the flash units currently sold by Nikon.

Its automatic exposure system is very easy to override, and does not get in the way. The matching needle system in the viewfinder is very informative, easier to read in the sun light than the LEDs of the FG, and than the small LCD display of the FA. With the F3, the FE2 is probably the most usable Nikon camera of the early eighties.

How much for a Nikon FE2? The Nikon FE2 is a very good automatic exposure film camera, and its reputation has obviously an impact on its price. Specialized retailers  sell it between $130 (Bargain) and $270 (Top Condition). As usual, prices are a bit lower on eBay, but the FE2 does not seem to sell for less than $100, with peaks up to $180 for very nice items.I