Photography News, Reportage, Feature by Marco Secchi

While talking with some of the Awakening photographers early this morning about the differences on a photography feature, reportage or news, it came to my mind that a couple of years ago I wrote this little peace.

 Violence overshadows a pacific No Expo march attended by 30,000 people  in Milan  as police and protesters clash


1.Timing.

The major difference between a news story and a feature story is that a news story is time-sensitive. Media outlets want to publish news stories as quickly as possible after an event occurs. Feature stories, however, are not as time-dependent and contain no urgent content. You can shoot one anytime after an event occurs.

2. Style.
The  styles of a news story and a feature are different. In a news story, the emphasis is on content rather than form. News stories go straight to the point, using simple and strong  images to deliver the facts quickly. They usually average between 10-15 images.

Feature stories are often wider and have a story telling structure  and they have a creative flavour. Feature stories can be more than 20  images.

3. Beginning and ending.
A news story and a feature story have different types of beginnings and endings. News stories tell what the news is upfront and then give the most important details in the first few images . The beginning – or lead – of a feature story, on the other hand, doesn’t give the news straightaway. Instead, it hooks readers and keeps them looking at images until the last one.

A news story can end anywhere after you’ve described the most important facts, whereas a feature story ends with readers feeling satisfied that they gained some value and knowledge from viewing your images and the story.


Photography Awards by Marco Secchi

Photography Awards

Rito della Nivola - Holy Nail

These are the Photography Awards I like / trust and sometimes take part

Healthy lifestyle by Marco Secchi

After having been unwell for nearly two months, I decided to reduce the intake of medicines and try improve my health with natural products. These are the most important one I have introduced in my diet and the one are giving md betyter results

Apple Cider Vinegar and Honey

This drink is great for cleansing the gut, lowering blood pressure and more ener
Honey and apple cider vinegar each have many healing properties and when combined the benefits are even greater. They are rich in potassium which regulates heartbeat and muscle contraction and thus normalises blood pressure. Both ingredients improve digestion, support friendly gut flora, improve energy and stamina and have a gentle cleansing effect.

Fresh apple juice close up shot


This healing drink is super easy to make and it takes little time to prepare when you have the ingredients handy.

Ingredients:

1 – 1.5 tablespoons of organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar- Braggs brand is very good (start with 1 teaspoon and increase the dose)

1 – 2 teaspoons of raw honey (start with 1 teaspoon and increase if desired)

A few drops of lemon juice to taste

Dissolve the raw honey in a half a mug of warm water, cover and leave overnight for the enzymes present in raw honey to activate. In the morning add apple cider vinegar and lemon juice to the mug with honey and fill it with hot water. Mix well and have first thing in the morning around 20 minutes before breakfast.

You may need to get used to the taste at first but your taste buds will adjust pretty quickly.

Lowers blood pressure by promoting vasodilation

Improves overall gut health and supports good bacteria

Provides live enzymes that markedly improve digestion

Promotes gentle systemic detoxification daily

Stimulates circulation – effective for cold hands and feet

Boosts energy and decreases fatigue

Slows down ageing by speeding up toxin removal and improving skin health


Golden Milk

‘Turmeric milk’ aka ‘golden milk’ is known for a number of health benefits and so is ‘cinnamon milk’. These 2 ingredients go well with milk adding on to the flavor and health benefits. Turmeric cinnamon milk is prepared by using both these well-known and immunity boosting ingredients and is tasty too. Turmeric cinnamon milk is easy to prepare and here is its recipe along with health benefits:

  • May Help Reduce Inflammation and Joint Pain.

  • May Improve Memory and Brain Function.

  • Curcumin in Turmeric May Improve Mood.

  • May Protect Against Heart Disease.

  • May Lower Blood Sugar Levels.

  • May Reduce Blood pressure

1 cup that I drink at night

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsweetened milk

  • 1 tablespoon raw honey

  • 1 teaspoon coconut oil (I do not use it all the time)

  • 1/2 Teaspoon of Ginger ( I tend to use it fresh)

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric ( I tend to use it fresh)

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

  • Dash of nutmeg (Sometime)

  • Dash of black pepper

Energy Drink

The problem with vegetables, is no one wants to eat them! It’s unrealistic to believe that everyone eats enough vegetables. There’s a reason why our parents had to shove them down our throats…

Instead of force-feeding ourselves vegetables, there’s a simple way to eat them, and that’s making homemade vegetable juice.  Vegetable juice gives you all the powerful nutrients of vegetables without the gut-wrenching responsibility of eating plates and plates of broccoli.

The best way to get vegetable juice is to buy a juicer and juice at home.

There are many juicer models available. Really, it doesn’t matter which model you have as long as you get one. Go to your nearest home store and buy whichever one fits your budget.


4 Beets

2 Lemons

3 Celery Sticks

1 Tomato

A Handful of Pomegranate Seeds


I have introduced in my diet

Sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds

Dry Apricots

Peanuts

Run

At present I run approximately 5k three times a week and I manage to achieve this target using one of the many apps you can find online!



WOW Hungary! :-) by Marco Secchi

Few reasons to visit Hungary!

LOCATIONS:

Galyatető Turistacentrum és Bivak / Tourist Centre and Bivouac at Galyatető

Hortobágyi Halastó Major / Hortobágy Great Fishponds

Csopak, Balaton-part / Shore of Lake Balaton at Csopak

Tihanyi Bencés Apátság / Tihany Benedictine Abbey

Hortobágyi Nemzeti Park / Hortobágy National Park

Lillafüred, Hámori Vízesés / Szinva waterfall in Lillafüred

Hercegkút, Gombos-hegyi Pincesor / Gombos-hegyi Cellars, Hercegkút

Fertőrákos, Fertő tó part / Fertőrákos and the shore of Lake Neusiedl

Balatonföldvár, Balaton part / Shore of Lake Balaton at Balatonföldvár

Sopron Storno Ház / Storno House in Sopron

Fertőd Eszterházi Kastély / Esterháza Palace in Fertőd

Hortobágy Kilenclyukú híd / Nine-holed Bridge at Hortobágy

Lillafüredi Kisvasút állomás / Narrow-gauge train station, Lillafüred

Poroszló, Tisza tavi vízi sétány / Lake Tisza Educational Trail in Poroszló

Balaton-felvidéki tanúhegyek / Buttes of the Balaton Uplands

Hortobágy, Halastavi Kisvasút / Narrow-gauge train at Hortobágy Fishponds

Hollókő / Hollókő

Pécsely Vászoly között félúton / halfway between Pécsey and Vászoly

Lillafüred, Hámori tó / Lake Hámori, Lillafüred

Sopron, belváros / City centre of Sopron

Fonyód, Emberpár szobor / Statue in Fonyód

Poroszló, Tisza tó / Lake Tisza at Poroszló

Kisoroszi szigetcsúcs / Island-tip at Kisoroszi

Mátraszentimre Bagolyirtás / Bagolyirtás at Mátraszentimre

Fertőrákosi Kőfejtő / Quarry of Fertőrákos

Salföldi Major – Balatonfelvidéki Nemzeti Park / Salföld Manor - Balaton Uplands National Park

Debrecen, Békás-tó / Lake Békás, Debrecen

Egri Főszékesegyház / Cathedral Basilica of St. John the Apostle

Szt. István Bazilika / St. Stephen's Basilica

Magyar Bencés Kongregáció Pannonhalmi Főapátság / Pannonhalma Archabbey

Mádi Zsinagóga / Synagogue in Mád

Sárospataki Református Kollégium Tudományos Gyűjteményei Nagykönyvtár / Scientific Collections Of The Reformed College of Sárospatak

Tákos Református Templom / Reformed Church of Tákos

Sarród, Fertő Hanság Nemzeti Park / Fertő-Hanság National Park at Sarród

Nagyhegyes, Tuba Tanya / Tuba Tanya at Nagyhegyes

Debrecen, Ikon Étterem / Ikon Restaurant in Debrecen

Fertőrákos, Ráspi Étterem / Ráspi Restaurant, Fertőrákos

Encs, Anyukám Mondta Étterem / Restaurant Anyukám Mondta, Encs

Lillafüredi Pisztrángtelep és Erdei Halsütöde / Lillafüred Trout Farm and Restaurant

Dobó István Egri Vármúzeum és Vár / Eger Castle and István Dobó Castle Museum

Visegrádi Vár / Visegrád Castle

Boldogkő Vára / Boldogkő Castle

Egri Dobó tér / Dobó Square, Eger

Sopron, Csoszogi Úr Schuszter Műhelye / Mr. Csoszogi's Shoemaker Workshop in Sopron

Sárvár belváros / City centre, Sárvár

Sopron Tűztorony / Fire Tower in Sopron

Balatonfüred, Annagora Aquapark / Annagora Aquapark in Balatonfüred

Sárvár Spirit Hotel / Hotel Spirit, Sárvár

Tarcal, Andrássy Rezidencia / Andrássy Rezidencia in Tarcal

Tapolcai-tavasbarlang / Lake Cave Tapolca

Abádszalók, Tisza-tó / Lake Tisza at Abádszalók

Kis-Balaton, Kányavári-híd / Kányavári Bridge, Lake Balaton Minor

Balatonfüred, Wakeboard Centrum / Wakeboard Centre in Balatonfüred

Badacsony, Laposa Borbirtok / Laposa Winery, Badacsony

Mád, Holdvölgy Borászat és Pincerendszer / Holdvölgy Winery and Cellars

Tarcal, Szt. Teréz Kápolna / St. Teresa Chapel in Tarcal

Fertőrákos és Balf közötti szőlőárusok / Grape vendors between Fertőrákos and Balf

Eger, Gál Tibor Fúzió Pincészet és Borbár / Gál Tibor Winery, Eger

Noszvaj, Lombházak / Treehouses in Noszvaj

Tiszadob, Andrássy Kastély / Andrássy Palace in Tiszadob

Hévízi Tófürdő / Lake Hévíz

Noszvaj, Nomád Hotel és Glamping / Nomad Hotel and Glamping in Noszvaj

Keszthely, Festetics-kastély / Festetics Palace in Keszthely

Balatonfűzfő, Balatoni Bob Szabadidőpark / Balaton Bob Leisure Park, Balatonfűzfő

Gyöngyös, High Tech Sportok Bázisa / High Tech Sports' Centre, Gyöngyös

Budapest, Sziget Fesztivál / Sziget Festival, Budapest

Zamárdi, Balaton Sound / Balaton Sound Festival, Zamárdi

Sopron, Volt Fesztivál / Volt Festival, Sopron

Balatonboglár, Gömbkilátó / Sphere Lookout, Balatonboglár

Balatonfüred, Black Swan Koktélbár / Black Swan Cocktail Bar, Balatonfüred

Dunakanyar / Danube Bend

Why I left Venice for the Countryside! by Marco Secchi

Sometimes you explore a new place and are surprised to feel so at home. A feeling deep down in your gut that you belong there. And everything just seems to flow together. This is what happened between me and the rural countryside in Hungary, I have not chosen the place but is Orseg that  has finally  chosen me!

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Although I lived in Venice and Milan not to mention many years in London and Edinburgh, I spent most of my life living in a home with small/medium/big gardens. I have great memories with friends and family… 

Now I live half time in Ljubljana the pretty capital of Slovenia and in Őrségi Nemzeti Park in Hungary

Like me, you may be someone who spent most of your life in the big city and wondered what it would be like to live in the country. Here are my top 3 reasons why I left Venice and found myself at home in the rural countryside.

#1 Too many people, cars and buildings

Living in Venice was giving me a touch of claustrophobia. Walking stuck in a herd of a hundred people on the sidewalk is a nightmare to me.

Some big cities are much more sprawling, but certain things you can’t escape. I lived in London and you’ll drive for an hour and all housing subdivisions look the same, every neighbourhood has the same Big Chain stores, and the streets get jam-packed during rush hour.

Is that how we’re meant to spend our time? I really don’t think so.

Let me tell you, today I live in the country. When I need to drive into town, I pass acres of farms, foxes, deer, sunflowers fields exploding up from the horizon. 

 created by dji camera

 

#2 There’s too much smog in the city

It’s not normal or healthy to be surrounded by smog. This sounds obvious but millions of people choose to do so.

Breathing in dirty, dusty sand is bad enough. But heavy smog from industrial pollution is deadly serious to your health. Respiratory problems, skin conditions, cancer, and other damaging effects are to be expected when you live in a cloud of toxic pollution. Plus, if you are going to spend money to live somewhere – shouldn’t it be pleasing to the eyes?

I found Venice extremely polluted and I could not stay without using my inhalers at least twice a day

And this isn’t a static condition. It’s something that gets worse every single day. 

#3 Where are people going to wish they lived in 5-10 years?

After having lived in Venice for a few years, I greatly appreciate the quiet country life. When people come to visit, you can see the stress melting off them. 

I am more creative, I can think more freely and see the world and what is around me in a better more relaxed way, I am not upset all the time, I love it!

I tend to meet more real people with real problems, Social media is less important but stopping and having a coffee or a Palinka is very much appreciated. You may cue in a small grocery store for 20 min because of chats but quality of life is more relaxed, there is a different perception of time. I appreciate more what I have got and what I really need, I am much more closer to a minimalistic way of life... and I am experimenting again the  100 thing you posses or rule 333. There is no luxury, dress code, fashion, etc you are considered for what you really are and what you do and not for how you "appear".

For these reasons and more, I feel that areas like this will be among the most hotly contested within the next decade. Things are getting weird quick in the big cities. People are getting fed up and they want out.  

Claim a spot while you can!

 

Why I freely share some images on @Unsplash by Marco Secchi

“Beauty has always been free. It came in the box with sunlight and eyeballs. It was granted to us upon birth as we first laid eyes upon our beautiful mothers and then mother earth. For those of us with extreme empathy and a wide-eyed approach to seeing the world, finding the beautiful all around us and capturing it is a deep and glorious honor. Yes, you can have that image at the top for free — perhaps not because it has no value, but because I simply want you to see what I can see. "

    
The above sentence by Swiss photographer  Samuel Zeller reassumes  in few short sentences the main reason why I do love making some of my images free on @Unsplash.

I have a very limited number of free images probably less than 30 but is something that I feel very passionate about it I love to give something back, share what i see for free plus there are few other practical reasons:

 

1) I am constantly inspired by the contents and images of @unsplash.  Here the spotlight being on the pictures, they have the space they need. Between a fraction of a mobile screen, and a full screen, it’s obvious which is going to better display and enhance the content.

If  you have ever visited Unsplash, you’ll agree  with me that the feeds are filled with amazing pictures. Pictures that you can take inspiration and learn from. 

I am also learning a lot on what people and companies are looking for. Here is not  a matter of clicking to give a Like but is what they download and use. So it is good to perfect my craft and develop my skills as far as possible.

2) I started to receive small monetary donations from users showing their appreciation for letting them use my work. They didn’t have to do that.  At the same way I do not need to give my photos away for free. But we both did. I also started to receive bookings and made partnerships that I would have not found in normal and traditional way or with my  regular contacts, agents and channels. Due to some of the images I have on Unsplash, I got commercial jobs, to take pictures with my drone, work for hotels, touristic resorts, not to mention I got bookings for workshops and photo walks. In other words, I made much more money giving free these images than if I would have ever sold them, and that is for sure!

3) The culture of the new is the major problem with photography online on social media as curator and photographer Andy Adams explain « It’s always about the new which inevitably means the not new drops off our radars way sooner that it should »

Social network like Twitter, Facebook  and Instagram are for sure a problem for photographers due to this particular reason. They are good for commercial brands because they can afford to hire social media managers and post regularly.

The images I share for free  on Unsplash don’t lose value, there is no difference at all between a year old shot and a week old shot. Their value are not based on time. When I do not post new images on Unsplash, even for  a month or more I still get a lot of downloads, likes and views.....EVERY day. So I get promoted and is  a free advertising.  Try not posting on Instagram for a month… ;-)

 

How to See the 2018 Shooting starts or Perseid Meteor Shower by Marco Secchi

Anticipation is quite high for this year’s shooting stars, which peaks over a moonless weekend with projected rates of 90 to 120 meteors an hour.

photo-1523474635051-1026672b4805.jpg

 

Sky-watchers around the world are eagerly anticipating the arrival of the Perseid meteor shower, which will be at its best from August 12 to 13. Often one of the most impressive spectacles of its kind, the Perseid shower should be especially vivid this year because the sky will be moonless and dark during the peak.

The Perseids are actually visible from July 17 to August 24, although you’ll see only a few meteors an hour throughout most of that time period. The sky show spikes on the peak dates, with an expected average of 90 shooting stars an hour.

If you have clear skies, this deep darkness should deliver a great performance on the evening of August 12, with rates of up to 120 shootings stars an hour visible from countryside locales. Observers in eastern North America, Europe, and the Middle East should get the best seats for this meteor bonanza since the exact peak is expected to occur at 9 p.m. ET (01:00 UT).

While you can start hunting for Perseids as soon as it gets dark, the best viewing may be after local midnight and into the predawn hours of the 13th, when the skies will be at their darkest and your part of the globe will face the incoming meteor cloud. (See pictures of the Perseid meteor shower.)

Meteors will be visible even under bright suburban skies, but you can expect to see only a quarter to half as many shooting stars. No matter where you are, allow about half an hour for your eyes to adjust to the darkness before you start sky-watching in earnest.

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The Perseids grace our skies when Earth ploughs through a cloud of fragments left behind by comet Swift-Tuttle, which last flew near the sun back in 1992. As the comet zooms in from the outer reaches of the solar system, its ices vaporize, and it releases debris ranging in size from sand grains to boulders. The particles get spread along the comet’s orbital path in such a way that Earth crosses the debris field around mid-August every year.


When that happens, the comet pieces slam into our atmosphere at speeds of around a hundred thousand miles an hour, causing the meteors to burn up and produce the brilliant streaks across the sky that we affectionately call shooting stars. (Here’s how scientists think we can create artificial meteor showers.)

Meteors will appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus, the mythical hero, which will rise after local midnight in the northeastern sky.

Despite their Greek namesake, the earliest known record of the Perseids appears in ancient Chinese texts, which mention awe-inspiring views of over a hundred meteors an hour as far back as A.D. 36.

Reported sightings continued throughout the centuries in many other cultures. In medieval Europe, devout Catholics referred to the phenomenon as the “tears of St. Lawrence,” since the yearly display coincided with the anniversary of the death of Lawrence the martyr. But astronomers didn’t recognize the link between the sky show and comets until the late 1800s.


Souvenir Snapshot1.  

What do you need.....

•    DSLR body
•    All of your batteries (and spares batteries; if you have an extended grip that holds AAs, bring it)
•    Fast wide-angle prime or zoom lens (f2.8 or faster) with UV or skylight filter attached
•    Heavy duty tripod
•    Cable release or intervalometer (see below)
•    A really comfortable outdoor reclining chair
•    A good flashlight
•    Lens-cleaning supplies

Why do I suggest a wide-angle lens and not a telephoto lens? Probability. The more sky you cover, the greater the likelihood of capturing a shooting star.  You can cover twice as much sky with a 24 or 28mm lens than you can with a 50mm lens and the difference gets more dramatic the longer the lens gets. You may get lucky and pick just the right spot with a telephoto lens, but your odds of getting your perfect shot increase tremendously as you cover a greater area of sky.

The intervalometer is one item on the equipment list that you might not be familiar with. Think of it as a cable release on steroids. With a cable release, you’re shooting one frame at a time. With the intervalometer, you can program the length of the exposure, and the delay between shots. And you can program the number of frames you want to shoot. If you look on Ebay you can get a nice intervalometer for $30 or less.

1.  Open and level the tripod.
2.    Mount your camera and estimate where the best position and angle is for shooting.
3.    An app for your smartphone called “Starglobe” is invaluable at finding the location of constellations in the night sky.
4.    Set the shutter speed on “B” or Bulb.
5.    Set your lenses focus control switch to “MANUAL” this will keep it from searching for infinity in the dark.
6.    Set the aperture to wide open.
7.    Attach your cable release or Intervalometer.
8.    Set the focus to INFINITY by manually aligning the infinity mark on the lens with the focal length point on the barrel you are using.
9.    Set the ISO to either 800 or 1600 to start (experiment from there).
10.    If your camera has mirror lock-up, use it (this will reduce vibration caused by the mirror).
11.    Verify your exposure settings (I shoot at 30 seconds to avoid star movement and spiraling).
12.    Press the start or release button.
13.    Check your first frame for focus by zooming in on the LCD display screen and adjust if necessary.